The Resource [Partial letter to Anne Greene Chapman Dicey]

[Partial letter to Anne Greene Chapman Dicey]

Label
[Partial letter to Anne Greene Chapman Dicey]
Title
[Partial letter to Anne Greene Chapman Dicey]
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1806-1885
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Chapman, Maria Weston
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
d. 1879
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Dicey, Anne Greene Chapman
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Chapman, Maria Weston
  • Dicey, Anne Greene Chapman
  • Butler, Benjamin F.
  • Dicey, Edward
  • Garrison, William Lloyd
  • McClellan, George Brinton
  • Sumner, Charles
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
  • United States
Label
[Partial letter to Anne Greene Chapman Dicey]
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph
  • The beginning of this letter is missing. This unsigned letter was presumably written by Maria Weston Chapman to Anne Greene Chapman [Dicey]
  • Maria W. Chapman writes: "The moral sense of the great majority of even the abolitionists has been destroyed by it [Civil War] imperceptibly & they show an affinity for the dark ages, ...Garrison is untouched by this madness--but I see very few others able to stand the strain of this revolution. I should say, of public men [Charles] Sumner stood it best." Chapman believes that there will be a second great uprising "to force the war to a conclusion by breaking down slavery..." She points out that the result of the "delays before Richmond" does not in itself mean disaster, rather "it is that the army is a skeleton. These things are not permitted to be told." Chapman refers to a little New Hampshire town that sent 17 men to the army of the Potomac: "they are all dead: --not in battle." She tells of a New England regiment that started for the Potomac 900 strong, 60 are left. Chapman comments that "McClellan's prestige is fading out." She enumerates some encouraging features, such as the passing of the confiscation bill, "in effect an Emancipation bill with clogs on." The young [James] Lowell "is alive after all, or was. He was carried to a farm-house off the field." Edward Dicey has just left; Anne Greene Chapman will soon see him, for he sails tomorrow. Chapman discusses the English criticism of McClellan. Wells Alvord and George Welles have just returned; they have told Ann Alvord that "McClellan was all that was adorable. They & the army swore by him." Chapman does not "expect to have a cent when the war ends," but that does not trouble her. Chapman reports that "Gen. Butler is before the committee of examination on charge of peculation in army contracts. It seems incredible that the charge should be true."
  • Includes accompanying envelope with the delivery address: "Miss Anne G. Chapman, care of Monsieur Laugel, 6 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surray, Eng."
Extent
1 online resource (2 leaves (8 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Partial letter to Anne Greene Chapman Dicey]
Link
Publication
Note
  • Holograph
  • The beginning of this letter is missing. This unsigned letter was presumably written by Maria Weston Chapman to Anne Greene Chapman [Dicey]
  • Maria W. Chapman writes: "The moral sense of the great majority of even the abolitionists has been destroyed by it [Civil War] imperceptibly & they show an affinity for the dark ages, ...Garrison is untouched by this madness--but I see very few others able to stand the strain of this revolution. I should say, of public men [Charles] Sumner stood it best." Chapman believes that there will be a second great uprising "to force the war to a conclusion by breaking down slavery..." She points out that the result of the "delays before Richmond" does not in itself mean disaster, rather "it is that the army is a skeleton. These things are not permitted to be told." Chapman refers to a little New Hampshire town that sent 17 men to the army of the Potomac: "they are all dead: --not in battle." She tells of a New England regiment that started for the Potomac 900 strong, 60 are left. Chapman comments that "McClellan's prestige is fading out." She enumerates some encouraging features, such as the passing of the confiscation bill, "in effect an Emancipation bill with clogs on." The young [James] Lowell "is alive after all, or was. He was carried to a farm-house off the field." Edward Dicey has just left; Anne Greene Chapman will soon see him, for he sails tomorrow. Chapman discusses the English criticism of McClellan. Wells Alvord and George Welles have just returned; they have told Ann Alvord that "McClellan was all that was adorable. They & the army swore by him." Chapman does not "expect to have a cent when the war ends," but that does not trouble her. Chapman reports that "Gen. Butler is before the committee of examination on charge of peculation in army contracts. It seems incredible that the charge should be true."
  • Includes accompanying envelope with the delivery address: "Miss Anne G. Chapman, care of Monsieur Laugel, 6 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surray, Eng."
Extent
1 online resource (2 leaves (8 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

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    300 Funston Ave, San Francisco, CA, 94118, US
    37.7823215 -122.4716373

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