The Resource [Letter to] My dear Mrs. Chapman

[Letter to] My dear Mrs. Chapman

Label
[Letter to] My dear Mrs. Chapman
Title
[Letter to] My dear Mrs. Chapman
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1807-1877
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Carpenter, Mary
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1806-1885
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Chapman, Maria Weston
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Chapman, Maria Weston
  • Carpenter, Mary
  • Burritt, Elihu
  • Garrison, William Lloyd
  • Palfrey, John Gorham
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
  • France
Label
[Letter to] My dear Mrs. Chapman
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • In this letter, Mary Carpenter refers to "the mischance of our Bristol boxes." She is pleased that William Lloyd Garrison would like to have one of her drawings. She asks Maria Weston Chapman to choose the most beautiful and placid drawing for him. Carpenter comments about William Lloyd Garrison: "I greatly value his friendship, & esteem it a privilege to be personally acquainted with a devoted & earnest a servant of his Lord." She hopes Maria W. Chapman will see Bristol before she goes to London and the continent. She expresses admiration for Elihu Burritt. Carpenter says about Elihu Burritt: "I have seen nothing in his writings of compromising character..." She says that "'his still, small voice' has united in a League of Brotherhood 20,000 English with as many Americans." She refers to "the unhappy proceedings about the printing press, etc. & the separation of the Liberty party from the old Abolitionists," but which Carpenter can form no opinion. Carpenter cannot condemn Elihu Burritt "solely because he lectured for Liberty Party." The English regard abolitionists as all those who exert themselves for the abolition of slavery. She mentions especially Dr. [John Gorham] Palfrey. Carpenter draws an analogy between Unitarians who hold other Christians as unprincipled and abolitionists who suppose people to be unprincipled because they have not separated from the constitution. Carpenter is "glad to live at" a period which will be "a world era." She comments on the recent French revolution and the signs of "free spiritual life" in Italy, Austria, and Russia
Extent
1 online resource (3 leaves (11 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] My dear Mrs. Chapman
Link
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • In this letter, Mary Carpenter refers to "the mischance of our Bristol boxes." She is pleased that William Lloyd Garrison would like to have one of her drawings. She asks Maria Weston Chapman to choose the most beautiful and placid drawing for him. Carpenter comments about William Lloyd Garrison: "I greatly value his friendship, & esteem it a privilege to be personally acquainted with a devoted & earnest a servant of his Lord." She hopes Maria W. Chapman will see Bristol before she goes to London and the continent. She expresses admiration for Elihu Burritt. Carpenter says about Elihu Burritt: "I have seen nothing in his writings of compromising character..." She says that "'his still, small voice' has united in a League of Brotherhood 20,000 English with as many Americans." She refers to "the unhappy proceedings about the printing press, etc. & the separation of the Liberty party from the old Abolitionists," but which Carpenter can form no opinion. Carpenter cannot condemn Elihu Burritt "solely because he lectured for Liberty Party." The English regard abolitionists as all those who exert themselves for the abolition of slavery. She mentions especially Dr. [John Gorham] Palfrey. Carpenter draws an analogy between Unitarians who hold other Christians as unprincipled and abolitionists who suppose people to be unprincipled because they have not separated from the constitution. Carpenter is "glad to live at" a period which will be "a world era." She comments on the recent French revolution and the signs of "free spiritual life" in Italy, Austria, and Russia
Extent
1 online resource (3 leaves (11 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

  • Internet ArchiveBorrow it
    300 Funston Ave, San Francisco, CA, 94118, US
    37.7823215 -122.4716373

Library Links

Processing Feedback ...