The Resource [Letter to] My dear Mrs. Chapman

[Letter to] My dear Mrs. Chapman

Label
[Letter to] My dear Mrs. Chapman
Title
[Letter to] My dear Mrs. Chapman
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1820-1902
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Estlin, Mary Anne
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1806-1885.
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Chapman, Maria Weston
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Chapman, Maria Weston
  • Estlin, Mary Anne
  • Estlin, J. B.
  • Grant, James
  • Nichol, Elizabeth Pease
  • Phillips, Wendell
  • Tappan, Lewis
  • Tribe, Fanny N
  • Webb, Richard Davis
  • Weston, R. Warren
  • Abolitionists
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] My dear Mrs. Chapman
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertomydearmr00estl14
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Mary Anne Estlin is glad about the good reports of Maria Weston Chapman's brother, which will enable Chapman and her party to enjoy "the charms of an old English country mansion." Mary A. Estlin writes that it is a "satisfaction to know you are on your way to us; for there are hosts of things accumulated to talk about; & ever since my return I have been plied with questions as to when Mrs. Chapman would be here!" Miss Tribe's and Mary A. Estlin's "pupils" in the Ladies Anti-Slavery Committee "are advanced a good deal in their A.S. education" through the help of [James] Grant, and are being roused to "a high pitch of indignation abainst Scoble." Miss Tribe is indoctrinating the editors of the Patriot, the official publication of the Congregationalists and Baptists. [Richard D.] Webb has written a comment on Lewis Tappan's statement for the Bristol Examiner. Mary A. Estlin's father, John Bishop Estlin, is not well. They have had "the treat of seeing Miss Pease," who is "quite full of the idea of a fresh organization, & especially of the hint you threw out of Mr. Wendell Phillips coming to start it." She wishes Mrs. Phillips could be persuaded that a visit to England might make her well. She tells which acquaintances Maria Weston Chapman may expect to see in Bristol. Elizabeth Pease left 5 pounds for the Boston bazaar. She stayed in Bristol with a cousin who "looks upon Miss A. Weston as a melancholy evidence of the deleterious influence of 'evil communications.'"
Extent
1 online resource (2 leaves (6 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] My dear Mrs. Chapman
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertomydearmr00estl14
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Mary Anne Estlin is glad about the good reports of Maria Weston Chapman's brother, which will enable Chapman and her party to enjoy "the charms of an old English country mansion." Mary A. Estlin writes that it is a "satisfaction to know you are on your way to us; for there are hosts of things accumulated to talk about; & ever since my return I have been plied with questions as to when Mrs. Chapman would be here!" Miss Tribe's and Mary A. Estlin's "pupils" in the Ladies Anti-Slavery Committee "are advanced a good deal in their A.S. education" through the help of [James] Grant, and are being roused to "a high pitch of indignation abainst Scoble." Miss Tribe is indoctrinating the editors of the Patriot, the official publication of the Congregationalists and Baptists. [Richard D.] Webb has written a comment on Lewis Tappan's statement for the Bristol Examiner. Mary A. Estlin's father, John Bishop Estlin, is not well. They have had "the treat of seeing Miss Pease," who is "quite full of the idea of a fresh organization, & especially of the hint you threw out of Mr. Wendell Phillips coming to start it." She wishes Mrs. Phillips could be persuaded that a visit to England might make her well. She tells which acquaintances Maria Weston Chapman may expect to see in Bristol. Elizabeth Pease left 5 pounds for the Boston bazaar. She stayed in Bristol with a cousin who "looks upon Miss A. Weston as a melancholy evidence of the deleterious influence of 'evil communications.'"
Extent
1 online resource (2 leaves (6 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

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    300 Funston Ave, San Francisco, CA, 94118, US
    37.7823215 -122.4716373

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