The Resource [Letter to] My dear Miss Weston

[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston

Label
[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston
Title
[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1820-1902
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Estlin, Mary Anne
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1808-1882
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Weston, Caroline
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Weston, Caroline
  • Estlin, Mary Anne
  • Brown, William Wells
  • Campbell, John
  • Carpenter, Russell Lant
  • Follen, Eliza Lee Cabot
  • Martineau, Harriet
  • Thompson, George
  • Weston, Anne Warren
  • United States.
  • New England Non-Resistance Society
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Mary Anne Estlin has forwarded the correspondence between Miss Wigham and Anne W. Weston to the care of Messrs. Greene & Co, Paris. Estlin writes: "People are so impressed with Miss A. W.'s [Anne Weston] liberality...that I do hope they will be enlightened by her clear explanations." She expresses interest in the Fugitive Slave Law. She wants to see what the Boston clergy will do in response to the colored citizens' appeal. She discusses Russell Carpenter, mentioning the coolness of his manner. The donation made by Mr. Lupton of Leeds to the Boston fair contains the work of Harriet Martineau. Estlin has been trying to interest people in the anti-slavery cause and in William W. Brown. George Thompson sails for Boston on the 19th. Estlin tells of Clevedon, her home life, and her father's health. She is delighted to hear that Mrs. Eliza Follen is established in London. She wants to bring Mrs. Massie and Mrs. Follen together. She comments on the inconsistency of the non-resistants in the Fugitive Slave Law situation. Richard Smith says that George Thompson's eulogy of Garrison in his parting speech has provoked an attack from Dr. [John] Campbell
Extent
1 online resource (2 leaves (8 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston
Link
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Mary Anne Estlin has forwarded the correspondence between Miss Wigham and Anne W. Weston to the care of Messrs. Greene & Co, Paris. Estlin writes: "People are so impressed with Miss A. W.'s [Anne Weston] liberality...that I do hope they will be enlightened by her clear explanations." She expresses interest in the Fugitive Slave Law. She wants to see what the Boston clergy will do in response to the colored citizens' appeal. She discusses Russell Carpenter, mentioning the coolness of his manner. The donation made by Mr. Lupton of Leeds to the Boston fair contains the work of Harriet Martineau. Estlin has been trying to interest people in the anti-slavery cause and in William W. Brown. George Thompson sails for Boston on the 19th. Estlin tells of Clevedon, her home life, and her father's health. She is delighted to hear that Mrs. Eliza Follen is established in London. She wants to bring Mrs. Massie and Mrs. Follen together. She comments on the inconsistency of the non-resistants in the Fugitive Slave Law situation. Richard Smith says that George Thompson's eulogy of Garrison in his parting speech has provoked an attack from Dr. [John] Campbell
Extent
1 online resource (2 leaves (8 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

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