The Resource [Letter to] My dear Miss Weston

[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston

Label
[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston
Title
[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1801-1868
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Brooks, Mary Merrick
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1808-1882
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Weston, Caroline
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Weston, Caroline
  • Brooks, Mary Merrick
  • Emerson, Ralph Waldo
  • Rodman, Benjamin
  • Thoreau
  • Lyceums
  • Racism
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Mary Merrick Brooks writes: "You may say from me that Mr. E[merson] will not lecture before the Lyceum." Ralph Waldo Emerson argued that the Lyceum was "a popular thing designed for the benefit of all, particularly for the most ignorant." He would not know how to address an assembly from which this class was excluded, and "if any were excluded, it should be the cultivated classes." Mary M. Brooks hopes that Charles Sumner will also refuse to lecture. Sometimes Mary M. Brooks regrets being an abolitionist because of the knowledge gained of injustice and wrong. Mr. Emerson says that his friend Benjamin Rodman should have signed "that protest." The Misses Thoreau will go to the Boston fair; Mary M. Brooks would be glad if anyone could accomodate them for a few days
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston
Link
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Mary Merrick Brooks writes: "You may say from me that Mr. E[merson] will not lecture before the Lyceum." Ralph Waldo Emerson argued that the Lyceum was "a popular thing designed for the benefit of all, particularly for the most ignorant." He would not know how to address an assembly from which this class was excluded, and "if any were excluded, it should be the cultivated classes." Mary M. Brooks hopes that Charles Sumner will also refuse to lecture. Sometimes Mary M. Brooks regrets being an abolitionist because of the knowledge gained of injustice and wrong. Mr. Emerson says that his friend Benjamin Rodman should have signed "that protest." The Misses Thoreau will go to the Boston fair; Mary M. Brooks would be glad if anyone could accomodate them for a few days
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

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