The Resource [Letter to] My dear Friend

[Letter to] My dear Friend

Label
[Letter to] My dear Friend
Title
[Letter to] My dear Friend
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1805-1872
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Webb, Richard Davis
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1808-1882
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Weston, Caroline
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Weston, Caroline
  • Webb, Richard Davis
  • Beecher, Henry Ward
  • Channing, W. H.
  • Lincoln, Abraham
  • Sumner, Charles
  • Webb, Hannah
  • Webb, Richard
  • Brown, John
  • Democratic Party (U.S.)
  • Trent Affair, 1861
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] My dear Friend
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertomydear63webb3
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Richard Davis Webb cannot meet Caroline Weston in Bristol because his son, also named Richard, is soon to leave for California. However, he hopes to see Caroline Weston in Liverpool before she sails. Richard D. Webb sorely misses his wife, Hannah Webb, and writes about her with praise and admiration. Richard D. Webb expresses his own and Professor Cairnes's approbation of Abraham Lincoln's letter. In reference to Charles Sumner's fear of English intervention, Richard D. Webb says that he himself never feared active intervention except at the time of the Trent affair; Richard D. Webb believes that rulers and people sincerely desire to keep out of war. However, 999 out of 1000 of the people are surprised by the acts of the Democratic party, including the Irish mob in New York. Bereford Hope and others like him hate republics. He tells how the lectures of Henry Ward Beecher and William Henry Channing were received. Richard D. Webb's daughter, Deborah, altered the "somewhat barbarous orginal" of the lines to the "John Brown March."
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (6 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] My dear Friend
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertomydear63webb3
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Richard Davis Webb cannot meet Caroline Weston in Bristol because his son, also named Richard, is soon to leave for California. However, he hopes to see Caroline Weston in Liverpool before she sails. Richard D. Webb sorely misses his wife, Hannah Webb, and writes about her with praise and admiration. Richard D. Webb expresses his own and Professor Cairnes's approbation of Abraham Lincoln's letter. In reference to Charles Sumner's fear of English intervention, Richard D. Webb says that he himself never feared active intervention except at the time of the Trent affair; Richard D. Webb believes that rulers and people sincerely desire to keep out of war. However, 999 out of 1000 of the people are surprised by the acts of the Democratic party, including the Irish mob in New York. Bereford Hope and others like him hate republics. He tells how the lectures of Henry Ward Beecher and William Henry Channing were received. Richard D. Webb's daughter, Deborah, altered the "somewhat barbarous orginal" of the lines to the "John Brown March."
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (6 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

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