The Resource [Letter to] My Dear Wife

[Letter to] My Dear Wife

Label
[Letter to] My Dear Wife
Title
[Letter to] My Dear Wife
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
Citation location within source
v.3, no.212
Citation source
Merrill, Walter M. Letters of William Lloyd Garrison
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1805-1879
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Garrison, William Lloyd
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1811-1876.
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Garrison, Helen Eliza
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Garrison, William Lloyd
  • Garrison, Helen Eliza
  • Dawes, William
  • Douglass, Frederick
  • Finney, Charles Grandison
  • Hill, Hamilton
  • Hudson, Timothy B
  • Jones, Benjamin Smith
  • Keep, John
  • Mahan, Asa
  • Morgan, John
  • Mott, Lucretia
  • Stone, Lucy
  • Oberlin College
  • Antislavery movements
  • Abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] My Dear Wife
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertomydearwi00garr22
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed with initials
  • William Lloyd Garrison recalls the origins of Oberlin College. John Keep and William Dawes sought support for it in England in 1840. Oberlin was active in the relief of fugitives fleeing from the South. Garrison gives an account of the exercises for the graduating class in theology at Oberlin. Professor Finney advised hearty participation in all reforms. At the meeting yesterday, the principal topic of discussion was the "come-outerism" from the church and state. President Mahan favors the U.S. Constitution as an anti-slavery instrument. Frederick Douglass and William L. Garrison were entertained by Hamilton Hill, an English gentleman. They dined with Professor Hudson and saw Professor Morgan. The met Lucy Stone, who just graduated and is now preparing to go forth as a lecturer
  • On page four of this manuscript, William Lloyd Garrison continues writing this letter in Salem, [Ohio], on Sept. 5, 1847. In Salem, they stayed with Benjamin S. Jones. Garrison reports on the meetings in different towns. Garrison comments: "The tide of anti-slavery is rising daily. Every thing looks encouraging." James and Lucretia Mott are here; Lucretia spoke twice
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] My Dear Wife
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertomydearwi00garr22
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed with initials
  • William Lloyd Garrison recalls the origins of Oberlin College. John Keep and William Dawes sought support for it in England in 1840. Oberlin was active in the relief of fugitives fleeing from the South. Garrison gives an account of the exercises for the graduating class in theology at Oberlin. Professor Finney advised hearty participation in all reforms. At the meeting yesterday, the principal topic of discussion was the "come-outerism" from the church and state. President Mahan favors the U.S. Constitution as an anti-slavery instrument. Frederick Douglass and William L. Garrison were entertained by Hamilton Hill, an English gentleman. They dined with Professor Hudson and saw Professor Morgan. The met Lucy Stone, who just graduated and is now preparing to go forth as a lecturer
  • On page four of this manuscript, William Lloyd Garrison continues writing this letter in Salem, [Ohio], on Sept. 5, 1847. In Salem, they stayed with Benjamin S. Jones. Garrison reports on the meetings in different towns. Garrison comments: "The tide of anti-slavery is rising daily. Every thing looks encouraging." James and Lucretia Mott are here; Lucretia spoke twice
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

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