The Resource [Letter to] My Dear Friend

[Letter to] My Dear Friend

Label
[Letter to] My Dear Friend
Title
[Letter to] My Dear Friend
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1808-1877
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Quincy, Edmund
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1808-1882
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Weston, Caroline
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Weston, Caroline
  • Quincy, Edmund
  • Chapman, Gertrude
  • Gay, Sydney Howard
  • Knapp, Isaac
  • Lomax
  • May, Samuel J.
  • Simmons, Charles
  • Abolitionists
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] My Dear Friend
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertomydearfr00quin24
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Edmund Quincy sends his congratulations to Caroline Weston's family on the birth of a daughter to Henry Grafton Chapman and Maria Weston Chapman. Edmund Quincy writes: "What does he [Henry] think of a third daughter? For my part I think it well to have that stock of women kept up." Edmund Quincy conveys the substance of a letter from Arthur Tappan concerning censored passages in the last issue of the Anti-Slavery Reporter. Edmund Quincy comments on the character of Isaac Knapp and the struggle of the Liberator committee "with the storms of fate." Edmund Quincy remarks on the inconsistency of Samuel J. May in his attitude toward sectarianism and intolerance. He inserts an anecdote about Sydney Howard Gay, who has become an abolitionist. He tells about a conversation with his friend, Mrs. King, who told Edmund Quincy about Major and Mrs. Lomax, Virginians who emancipated their slaves. Edmund Quincy wonders about the extext of anti-slavery expression in the sermons of [Charles?] Simmons. He wishes Caroline Weston could talk with the members of the Dedham Female Anti-Slavery Society, as "their ignorance of business is remarkable."
Extent
1 online resource (2 leaves (6 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] My Dear Friend
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertomydearfr00quin24
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Edmund Quincy sends his congratulations to Caroline Weston's family on the birth of a daughter to Henry Grafton Chapman and Maria Weston Chapman. Edmund Quincy writes: "What does he [Henry] think of a third daughter? For my part I think it well to have that stock of women kept up." Edmund Quincy conveys the substance of a letter from Arthur Tappan concerning censored passages in the last issue of the Anti-Slavery Reporter. Edmund Quincy comments on the character of Isaac Knapp and the struggle of the Liberator committee "with the storms of fate." Edmund Quincy remarks on the inconsistency of Samuel J. May in his attitude toward sectarianism and intolerance. He inserts an anecdote about Sydney Howard Gay, who has become an abolitionist. He tells about a conversation with his friend, Mrs. King, who told Edmund Quincy about Major and Mrs. Lomax, Virginians who emancipated their slaves. Edmund Quincy wonders about the extext of anti-slavery expression in the sermons of [Charles?] Simmons. He wishes Caroline Weston could talk with the members of the Dedham Female Anti-Slavery Society, as "their ignorance of business is remarkable."
Extent
1 online resource (2 leaves (6 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

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    300 Funston Ave, San Francisco, CA, 94118, US
    37.7823215 -122.4716373

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