The Resource [Letter to] My Dear Caroline

[Letter to] My Dear Caroline

Label
[Letter to] My Dear Caroline
Title
[Letter to] My Dear Caroline
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1808-1877
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Quincy, Edmund
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1808-1882
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Weston, Caroline
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Weston, Caroline
  • Quincy, Edmund
  • Brown, William Wells
  • Douglass, Frederick
  • Melville, Herman
  • Polk, James K.
  • Remond, Charles Lenox
  • Rodman, Alfred
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] My Dear Caroline
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Edmund Quincy begins this letter with remonstrances regarding Caroline Weston not having written to him. He read William Wells Brown's narrative and found it excellent. Edmund Quincy said: "It is a long time since I have seen a man, white or black, that I have cottoned to so much as I have to Brown, on so short an acquaintance." Edmund Quincy is the sub-editor of the Rev. Charles Spear. He went to a reception for President Polk. Not many people turned out to see him. He describes the meager welcome given the presidential procession. "What do they say in N.B. to the re-affiancing of Anna Motley to Alfred Rodman?" Edmund Quincy says that "Miss Shaw, the daughter of the Chief Justice is engaged to Typee Melville [Herman Melville]." He mentions Deborah Yerrinton's latest literary effort and his own letters. [Deborah Yerrinton is Edmund Quincy's pen name.] He tells of a financial dispute between William Wells Brown and Charles Lenox Remond over the disposition of money collected at Bristol County Anti-Slavery meetings. Edmund Quincy negotiated with Frederick Douglass for a series of letters to be published in the National Anti-Slavery Standard. He thinks Frederick Douglass wanted too much for them. Edmund Quincy discusses a problem connected with Caroline Weston's school in New Bedford
Extent
1 online resource (2 leaves (8 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] My Dear Caroline
Link
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Edmund Quincy begins this letter with remonstrances regarding Caroline Weston not having written to him. He read William Wells Brown's narrative and found it excellent. Edmund Quincy said: "It is a long time since I have seen a man, white or black, that I have cottoned to so much as I have to Brown, on so short an acquaintance." Edmund Quincy is the sub-editor of the Rev. Charles Spear. He went to a reception for President Polk. Not many people turned out to see him. He describes the meager welcome given the presidential procession. "What do they say in N.B. to the re-affiancing of Anna Motley to Alfred Rodman?" Edmund Quincy says that "Miss Shaw, the daughter of the Chief Justice is engaged to Typee Melville [Herman Melville]." He mentions Deborah Yerrinton's latest literary effort and his own letters. [Deborah Yerrinton is Edmund Quincy's pen name.] He tells of a financial dispute between William Wells Brown and Charles Lenox Remond over the disposition of money collected at Bristol County Anti-Slavery meetings. Edmund Quincy negotiated with Frederick Douglass for a series of letters to be published in the National Anti-Slavery Standard. He thinks Frederick Douglass wanted too much for them. Edmund Quincy discusses a problem connected with Caroline Weston's school in New Bedford
Extent
1 online resource (2 leaves (8 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

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