The Resource [Letter to] Dear Lizzy & Anne

[Letter to] Dear Lizzy & Anne

Label
[Letter to] Dear Lizzy & Anne
Title
[Letter to] Dear Lizzy & Anne
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1806-1885
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Chapman, Maria Weston
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
  • d. 1879
  • b. 1831
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Dicey, Anne Greene Chapman
  • Laugel, Elizabeth Bates Chapman
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Chapman, Maria Weston
  • Dicey, Anne Greene Chapman
  • Laugel, Elizabeth Bates Chapman
  • Chapman, Henry Grafton
  • Frémont, John Charles
  • Hugo, Victor
  • Phillips, Wendell
  • Investments
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
  • United States
  • Great Britain
Label
[Letter to] Dear Lizzy & Anne
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed with initials
  • Maria Weston Chapman begins the letter by writing: "A great battle has just been fought--as many as always will be called--100,000 men engaged on eached side. 8000 killed on our side & double the number on the side of the rebels. We are left in possession of the field, but the Enemy is being heavily reinforced as also are we." Chapman came to New York with Warren [Weston] and his family and to Bedford with Henry [G. Chapman]. Chapman "Arrived in season for a party of mingled Bedfordites & N. Yorkers." She tells about the bright sayings of little Henry Chapman. Chapman writes that "[John Charles] Fremont spoke in Boston last week, & said it [abolition] must be done immediately." There is no difficulty here about getting men or means for carrying on a war. Chapman judges from what she has heard that "Wendell [Phillips] has had an escape for seeming to discourage enlistment. But he can no other for he judges by the feelings of individuals, & not be the necessity of the situation. I see that we are fighting the slave power: & I cannot help morally speaking, encouraging enlistments." She elaborates on this idea. Chapman mentions as signs of the times in her own experience the $5000 in bills crowded into her handbag, "Henry to carry up to Bedford to pay off troop's bounty with." And seeing the diamonds he had bought as an investment, to be sent to Europe in payments because of the unfavorable exchange. Chapman says that "I observe that England has neither broken the Blockade nor acknowledged the Rebel independence." Chapman criticizes Victor Hugo's "[L'Idylle] Rue Plumet."
  • The battle referred to in this letter was the Seven Days' Battle in the Peninsular Campaign of the Civil War, June 25 - July 1, 1862
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (8 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] Dear Lizzy & Anne
Link
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed with initials
  • Maria Weston Chapman begins the letter by writing: "A great battle has just been fought--as many as always will be called--100,000 men engaged on eached side. 8000 killed on our side & double the number on the side of the rebels. We are left in possession of the field, but the Enemy is being heavily reinforced as also are we." Chapman came to New York with Warren [Weston] and his family and to Bedford with Henry [G. Chapman]. Chapman "Arrived in season for a party of mingled Bedfordites & N. Yorkers." She tells about the bright sayings of little Henry Chapman. Chapman writes that "[John Charles] Fremont spoke in Boston last week, & said it [abolition] must be done immediately." There is no difficulty here about getting men or means for carrying on a war. Chapman judges from what she has heard that "Wendell [Phillips] has had an escape for seeming to discourage enlistment. But he can no other for he judges by the feelings of individuals, & not be the necessity of the situation. I see that we are fighting the slave power: & I cannot help morally speaking, encouraging enlistments." She elaborates on this idea. Chapman mentions as signs of the times in her own experience the $5000 in bills crowded into her handbag, "Henry to carry up to Bedford to pay off troop's bounty with." And seeing the diamonds he had bought as an investment, to be sent to Europe in payments because of the unfavorable exchange. Chapman says that "I observe that England has neither broken the Blockade nor acknowledged the Rebel independence." Chapman criticizes Victor Hugo's "[L'Idylle] Rue Plumet."
  • The battle referred to in this letter was the Seven Days' Battle in the Peninsular Campaign of the Civil War, June 25 - July 1, 1862
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (8 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

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    300 Funston Ave, San Francisco, CA, 94118, US
    37.7823215 -122.4716373

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