The Resource [Letter to] Dear Deborah

[Letter to] Dear Deborah

Label
[Letter to] Dear Deborah
Title
[Letter to] Dear Deborah
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1806-1885
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Chapman, Maria Weston
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
b.1814
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Weston, Deborah
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Chapman, Maria Weston
  • Weston, Deborah
  • Dicey, Anne Greene Chapman
  • Howe, Julia Ward
  • Webb, Richard Davis
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] Dear Deborah
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertodeardebo00chap28
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • If nobody wants Maria Weston Chapman's side-saddle, she will send it to Mrs. Francis Gage, who needs one. Chapman comments: "But as far as my experience goes, it is far less fatiguing to ride astride." Chapman was at the Annual Meeting and saw all the usual friends, except for Pillsbury and Foster. At the meeting, "Mrs. Howe's battle-Hymn of the Republic was performed with unequalled power & effect -- one of our German friends, -- Lasar, having drilled the choir to the the expression of every shade of idea by variations & instrumentations." Chapman hears "an immense deal of the Adams-pass affair." She thinks the real difficulty is between England and Louis Napoleon. Chapman said: "He has got a handle against England by it, unless Eng. calls for satisfaction." Chapman received a letter from R.D.W. (Richard Davis Webb), who "speaks affectionately of Anne [Greene Chapman Dicey] 'grown up & presented at Court'--whom he remembers tending the little black & yellow kitten." Maria Weston Chapman continues this letter on Thursday, May 14, 1863. She writes that Wendell [Phillips] dined here last night. Chapman gives no advice [perhaps regarding his going to England]: "I do not judge him fit or able to do much in these circumstances. HIs vision & feeling are both too limited. H.W. Beecher is going."
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (6 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] Dear Deborah
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertodeardebo00chap28
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • If nobody wants Maria Weston Chapman's side-saddle, she will send it to Mrs. Francis Gage, who needs one. Chapman comments: "But as far as my experience goes, it is far less fatiguing to ride astride." Chapman was at the Annual Meeting and saw all the usual friends, except for Pillsbury and Foster. At the meeting, "Mrs. Howe's battle-Hymn of the Republic was performed with unequalled power & effect -- one of our German friends, -- Lasar, having drilled the choir to the the expression of every shade of idea by variations & instrumentations." Chapman hears "an immense deal of the Adams-pass affair." She thinks the real difficulty is between England and Louis Napoleon. Chapman said: "He has got a handle against England by it, unless Eng. calls for satisfaction." Chapman received a letter from R.D.W. (Richard Davis Webb), who "speaks affectionately of Anne [Greene Chapman Dicey] 'grown up & presented at Court'--whom he remembers tending the little black & yellow kitten." Maria Weston Chapman continues this letter on Thursday, May 14, 1863. She writes that Wendell [Phillips] dined here last night. Chapman gives no advice [perhaps regarding his going to England]: "I do not judge him fit or able to do much in these circumstances. HIs vision & feeling are both too limited. H.W. Beecher is going."
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (6 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

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