The Resource [Letter to Anne Warren Weston]

[Letter to Anne Warren Weston]

Label
[Letter to Anne Warren Weston]
Title
[Letter to Anne Warren Weston]
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1805-1872
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Webb, Richard Davis
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1812-1890
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Weston, Anne Warren
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Weston, Anne Warren
  • Webb, Richard Davis
  • Webb, Hannah
  • Garrison, William Lloyd
  • Haughton, James
  • Kossuth, Lajos
  • Poole, Elizabeth
  • Mathew, Theobald
  • Abolitionists
  • Anti-slavery fairs
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Letter to Anne Warren Weston]
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • There are two letters in this manuscript. On pages 1-6, there is a letter by Richard Davis Webb to Anne Warren Weston. Richard D. Webb characterizes James Haughton as a simple hearted man who would believe anything. Richard D. Webb believes "Father Mathew is not to be compared with James Haughton for nobility of character, and he is not worthy to tie Garrison's shoes." Richard D. Webb gives information about the articles contributed to the Boston fair. He mentions among the donors Mrs. Edmundson, the sister of Eliza Wigham; a Miss Phebe Mary Henzell, who is an admirer of Frederick Douglass; Richard D. Webb's cousin, Deborah Moore; and Maria Waring, whose "kind of munificence is not common with us." A child's muff was made by Richard Davis Webb's daughter Anne, who is not yet eleven years old. Richard D. Webb sends copies of an index to his anti-slavery pamphlets
  • On pages 6-8 in this manuscript, there is a separate letter by Hannah Webb to Anne Warren Weston. Hannah Webb suggests mentioning the Misses Haughton and Miss Henzell in the acknowledgements of the anti-slavery fair contributions. She comments on the difficulty of arousing anti-slavery interest and believes "people are so terribly afraid of contamination & heresy." Hannah Webb is troubled by "this whole matter of father Mathew" in the Liberator. Hannah Webb says: "I know that Garrison is right & I am wrong & yet I wish to see the man handled more gently." She considers Father Mathew's advanced years and infirmities. Hannah Webb was delighted with William Lloyd Garrison's article, "Kossuth & Jesus." Garrison is "above caring whether you (or anybody in the whole universe) approve of what he says---he only stands for the right, & herein is his strength." Hannah Webb refers to the "grand time" that her husband had with our friends at Versailles. She tells about the marriage of Lizzy Poole to one Addey. Hannah Webb explains her Quaker use of "thou."
  • This manuscript is a continuation of Richard Davis Webb's letter to Anne Warren Weston on Nov. 4, 1849, Call No. Ms.A.9.2 v.24, p.108
Extent
1 online resource (2 leaves (8 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to Anne Warren Weston]
Link
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • There are two letters in this manuscript. On pages 1-6, there is a letter by Richard Davis Webb to Anne Warren Weston. Richard D. Webb characterizes James Haughton as a simple hearted man who would believe anything. Richard D. Webb believes "Father Mathew is not to be compared with James Haughton for nobility of character, and he is not worthy to tie Garrison's shoes." Richard D. Webb gives information about the articles contributed to the Boston fair. He mentions among the donors Mrs. Edmundson, the sister of Eliza Wigham; a Miss Phebe Mary Henzell, who is an admirer of Frederick Douglass; Richard D. Webb's cousin, Deborah Moore; and Maria Waring, whose "kind of munificence is not common with us." A child's muff was made by Richard Davis Webb's daughter Anne, who is not yet eleven years old. Richard D. Webb sends copies of an index to his anti-slavery pamphlets
  • On pages 6-8 in this manuscript, there is a separate letter by Hannah Webb to Anne Warren Weston. Hannah Webb suggests mentioning the Misses Haughton and Miss Henzell in the acknowledgements of the anti-slavery fair contributions. She comments on the difficulty of arousing anti-slavery interest and believes "people are so terribly afraid of contamination & heresy." Hannah Webb is troubled by "this whole matter of father Mathew" in the Liberator. Hannah Webb says: "I know that Garrison is right & I am wrong & yet I wish to see the man handled more gently." She considers Father Mathew's advanced years and infirmities. Hannah Webb was delighted with William Lloyd Garrison's article, "Kossuth & Jesus." Garrison is "above caring whether you (or anybody in the whole universe) approve of what he says---he only stands for the right, & herein is his strength." Hannah Webb refers to the "grand time" that her husband had with our friends at Versailles. She tells about the marriage of Lizzy Poole to one Addey. Hannah Webb explains her Quaker use of "thou."
  • This manuscript is a continuation of Richard Davis Webb's letter to Anne Warren Weston on Nov. 4, 1849, Call No. Ms.A.9.2 v.24, p.108
Extent
1 online resource (2 leaves (8 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

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