The Resource [Letter to] My dearest Mrs. Chapman

[Letter to] My dearest Mrs. Chapman

Label
[Letter to] My dearest Mrs. Chapman
Title
[Letter to] My dearest Mrs. Chapman
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1820-1902
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Estlin, Mary Anne
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1806-1885.
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Chapman, Maria Weston
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Chapman, Maria Weston
  • Estlin, Mary Anne
  • Bigelow, John
  • Goodwin
  • British and Foreign Anti-slavery Society
  • Society of Friends
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
  • West Indies, British
Label
[Letter to] My dearest Mrs. Chapman
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Mary Anne Estlin thanks Maria Weston Chapman for her letter and for supplying what "ought to convince all who are open to conviction, & to prevent their puzzling themselves further as to why oil & water don't unite." The Quakers are "in an increasing state of effervescence, & I am prepared for their all withdrawing from our Committee..." Mary A. Estlin is sending, via an acquaintance named Miss Coates, a copy of John Bigelow's Jamaica, with a long letter from Mr. Webb in it. [The book mentioned is entitled: Jamaica in 1850; or the Effects of Sixteen Years of Freedom on a Slave Colony.] Estlin said: "The interest of the cause rest on my unaided hands." The severance from the Broad Street Society has not yet been accomplished. She mentions a Miss Goodwin who has "susceptibility of cultivation," presumably as the result of her brother's conversation with Maria Weston Chapman. After mentioning a Mr. Clark, "who writes such nonsense in the Examiner," Mary A. Estlin comments that "there is something very gratifying in having such a meagre set of opposition letters, & those only from quakers!"
  • Included is the accompanying envelope, with the delivery address: Mrs. Chapman, 17 Rue de Clichy, Paris
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] My dearest Mrs. Chapman
Link
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Mary Anne Estlin thanks Maria Weston Chapman for her letter and for supplying what "ought to convince all who are open to conviction, & to prevent their puzzling themselves further as to why oil & water don't unite." The Quakers are "in an increasing state of effervescence, & I am prepared for their all withdrawing from our Committee..." Mary A. Estlin is sending, via an acquaintance named Miss Coates, a copy of John Bigelow's Jamaica, with a long letter from Mr. Webb in it. [The book mentioned is entitled: Jamaica in 1850; or the Effects of Sixteen Years of Freedom on a Slave Colony.] Estlin said: "The interest of the cause rest on my unaided hands." The severance from the Broad Street Society has not yet been accomplished. She mentions a Miss Goodwin who has "susceptibility of cultivation," presumably as the result of her brother's conversation with Maria Weston Chapman. After mentioning a Mr. Clark, "who writes such nonsense in the Examiner," Mary A. Estlin comments that "there is something very gratifying in having such a meagre set of opposition letters, & those only from quakers!"
  • Included is the accompanying envelope, with the delivery address: Mrs. Chapman, 17 Rue de Clichy, Paris
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

  • Internet ArchiveBorrow it
    300 Funston Ave, San Francisco, CA, 94118, US
    37.7823215 -122.4716373

Library Links

Processing Feedback ...