The Resource [Letter to] My dear friend

[Letter to] My dear friend

Label
[Letter to] My dear friend
Title
[Letter to] My dear friend
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1805-1872
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Webb, Richard Davis
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1806-1885
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Chapman, Maria Weston
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Chapman, Maria Weston
  • Webb, Richard Davis
  • Douglass, Frederick
  • Edgeworth, Maria
  • Garrison, William Lloyd
  • Howitt, Mary Botham
  • Moore, Thomas
  • Anti-slavery fairs
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] My dear friend
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertomydearfr00webb31
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • The first four pages of this manuscript are unnumbered and then the pagination skips to pages 9-19. See Call No. Ms.A.9.2 v.16, p.21 for the possible missing pages 5-8 of this letter written by Richard Davis Webb on [2 Nov. 1846?]
  • Richard Davis Webb begins this letter on the steamer on the way to Liverpool to see William Lloyd Garrison off. He sent a Liberty Bell and a copy of "Martyr Age" to the poet Thomas Moore. He thinks that Maria Weston Chapman's application (that Moore contribute some writing to the Liberty Bell?) will not be successful because Moore "is too old and worldly to enter with poetic zeal into such a cause as ours." He does not expect much help for the literati of England. Richard D. Webb attributes Frederick Douglass's steadiness to William Lloyd Garrison's influence. He remarks on the "immense change in his position" when Douglass returns to America. Richard D. Webb wonders how Douglass will be able to bear the sight of his wife after "all the petting he gets" from elegant women in a country without color prejudice. Contributions from this side of the Atlantic to the anti-slavery bazaar will be finer than ever. Richard D. Webb saw much of William Lloyd Garrison in London and Dublin and comments that "he is truy transparent and guileless." Richard D. Webb has written to Charles McKay and to William and Mary Howitt for contributions to the Liberty Bell, but he hardly expects any. He sends notes from Mary Howitt, which may be sold for autographs at the fair; there is also one from Miss Maria Edgeworth. William Lloyd Garrison has been collecting daguerreotypes. Richard D. Webb continues this letter on November 3 and 4, and describes the people assembled to see William Lloyd Garrison. In the postscript, Richard Davis Webb announces a contribution from Mazzini
  • Includes an envelope with the delivery address: M. W. Chapman, Federal Street. On the envelope, is this note, which is written very lightly in pencil: "W. Phillips, Please to give to Edmund as soon as you & Ann have read them & tell him to return to me as soon as he has."
Extent
  • 1 online resource (4 leaves (15 pages))
  • 1 envelope ;
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] My dear friend
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertomydearfr00webb31
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • The first four pages of this manuscript are unnumbered and then the pagination skips to pages 9-19. See Call No. Ms.A.9.2 v.16, p.21 for the possible missing pages 5-8 of this letter written by Richard Davis Webb on [2 Nov. 1846?]
  • Richard Davis Webb begins this letter on the steamer on the way to Liverpool to see William Lloyd Garrison off. He sent a Liberty Bell and a copy of "Martyr Age" to the poet Thomas Moore. He thinks that Maria Weston Chapman's application (that Moore contribute some writing to the Liberty Bell?) will not be successful because Moore "is too old and worldly to enter with poetic zeal into such a cause as ours." He does not expect much help for the literati of England. Richard D. Webb attributes Frederick Douglass's steadiness to William Lloyd Garrison's influence. He remarks on the "immense change in his position" when Douglass returns to America. Richard D. Webb wonders how Douglass will be able to bear the sight of his wife after "all the petting he gets" from elegant women in a country without color prejudice. Contributions from this side of the Atlantic to the anti-slavery bazaar will be finer than ever. Richard D. Webb saw much of William Lloyd Garrison in London and Dublin and comments that "he is truy transparent and guileless." Richard D. Webb has written to Charles McKay and to William and Mary Howitt for contributions to the Liberty Bell, but he hardly expects any. He sends notes from Mary Howitt, which may be sold for autographs at the fair; there is also one from Miss Maria Edgeworth. William Lloyd Garrison has been collecting daguerreotypes. Richard D. Webb continues this letter on November 3 and 4, and describes the people assembled to see William Lloyd Garrison. In the postscript, Richard Davis Webb announces a contribution from Mazzini
  • Includes an envelope with the delivery address: M. W. Chapman, Federal Street. On the envelope, is this note, which is written very lightly in pencil: "W. Phillips, Please to give to Edmund as soon as you & Ann have read them & tell him to return to me as soon as he has."
Extent
  • 1 online resource (4 leaves (15 pages))
  • 1 envelope ;
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

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    37.7823215 -122.4716373

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