The Resource [Letter to] My dear Mrs. Chapman

[Letter to] My dear Mrs. Chapman

Label
[Letter to] My dear Mrs. Chapman
Title
[Letter to] My dear Mrs. Chapman
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1805-1879
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Garrison, William Lloyd
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1806-1885
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Chapman, Maria Weston
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Garrison, William Lloyd
  • Chapman, Maria Weston
  • Child, David Lee
  • Collins, John A.
  • Douglass, Frederick
  • Garrison, Helen Eliza
  • O'Connell, Daniel
  • Remond, Charles Lenox
  • Rogers, Nathaniel Peabody
  • Tappan, Lewis
  • Antislavery movements
  • Abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] My dear Mrs. Chapman
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • In this letter, William Lloyd Garrison reports on the improvement of his wife and her mother who were injured in a carriage accident. (This accident occurred in August 1843, when Garrison was driving his wife, child, and mother-in-law in a carriage. The carriage was upset in the accident.) Garrison believes that John Anderson Collins's resignation was probably seasonable on account of his "deep and absorbing interest" in the "no property scheme" and the "insignificance in which he has held the anti-slavery enterprise" for some time past. Garrison elaborates on John A. Collins: "I despise and abhor the spirit that would persecute or proscribe him, on account of his peculiar notions respecting property, and man being 'a creature of circumstances'---for, though I regard those notions as fallacious, I am not afraid of anything but the cowardly or despotic suppression of thought and speech." Garrison wants to know all the facts in the case of Collins's "painful affair" with Charles L. Remond and Frederick Douglass. Garrison remarks on the "wonderful transformation" of Nathaniel P. Rogers's mind, and says "his visit here was most refreshing to all hearts." Garrison discusses David Lee Child's article "Where we Are." It is surprising that Child "should allow the Standard to be the voluntary trumpeter of Lewis Tappan and his ostentatious mission to England." Garrison thinks that David L. Child does not "understand, fully, the philosophy of our reform" and wishes that Maria Weston Chapman would consent to be the editor of the Standard in case a change of editorship should be needed. For the second time, Daniel O'Connell has publically assailed "one Mr. Lloyd Garrison" for his "irreligious" opinions
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] My dear Mrs. Chapman
Link
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • In this letter, William Lloyd Garrison reports on the improvement of his wife and her mother who were injured in a carriage accident. (This accident occurred in August 1843, when Garrison was driving his wife, child, and mother-in-law in a carriage. The carriage was upset in the accident.) Garrison believes that John Anderson Collins's resignation was probably seasonable on account of his "deep and absorbing interest" in the "no property scheme" and the "insignificance in which he has held the anti-slavery enterprise" for some time past. Garrison elaborates on John A. Collins: "I despise and abhor the spirit that would persecute or proscribe him, on account of his peculiar notions respecting property, and man being 'a creature of circumstances'---for, though I regard those notions as fallacious, I am not afraid of anything but the cowardly or despotic suppression of thought and speech." Garrison wants to know all the facts in the case of Collins's "painful affair" with Charles L. Remond and Frederick Douglass. Garrison remarks on the "wonderful transformation" of Nathaniel P. Rogers's mind, and says "his visit here was most refreshing to all hearts." Garrison discusses David Lee Child's article "Where we Are." It is surprising that Child "should allow the Standard to be the voluntary trumpeter of Lewis Tappan and his ostentatious mission to England." Garrison thinks that David L. Child does not "understand, fully, the philosophy of our reform" and wishes that Maria Weston Chapman would consent to be the editor of the Standard in case a change of editorship should be needed. For the second time, Daniel O'Connell has publically assailed "one Mr. Lloyd Garrison" for his "irreligious" opinions
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

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    300 Funston Ave, San Francisco, CA, 94118, US
    37.7823215 -122.4716373

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