The Resource [Letter to] My dear Miss Weston

[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston

Label
[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston
Title
[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1785-1855
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Estlin, J. B.
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Weston
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Weston
  • Estlin, J. B.
  • United States.
  • British and Foreign Anti-slavery Society
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • John Bishop Estlin begins this letter with a discussion of mail deliveries, addresses, and the European travels of the Weston family. He mentions the Fugitive Slave Law meeting in Faneuil Hall. He does not blame the blacks for forcibly resisting arrest under the law. He says the British & Foreign Anti-Slavery Society won't do more than pass resolutions of disapproval. George Thompson arrived safely in America, and a book of engravings and a tray were sent to him. Estlin tells of H. Box Brown's financial distress. He mentions Dr. Gannett, R. Carpenter, praises Theodore Parker's stand, but criticizes William Wells Brown's impassioned language in his appeal for the bazaar. The English people think the abolitionists are retarding the emancipation of the slaves. J. B. Estlin discusses the state of his health and the subject of illness in general. He describes his European travels. They saw a student duel in Germany
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (10 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston
Link
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • John Bishop Estlin begins this letter with a discussion of mail deliveries, addresses, and the European travels of the Weston family. He mentions the Fugitive Slave Law meeting in Faneuil Hall. He does not blame the blacks for forcibly resisting arrest under the law. He says the British & Foreign Anti-Slavery Society won't do more than pass resolutions of disapproval. George Thompson arrived safely in America, and a book of engravings and a tray were sent to him. Estlin tells of H. Box Brown's financial distress. He mentions Dr. Gannett, R. Carpenter, praises Theodore Parker's stand, but criticizes William Wells Brown's impassioned language in his appeal for the bazaar. The English people think the abolitionists are retarding the emancipation of the slaves. J. B. Estlin discusses the state of his health and the subject of illness in general. He describes his European travels. They saw a student duel in Germany
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (10 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

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