The Resource [Letter to] My dear Miss Weston

[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston

Label
[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston
Title
[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1820-1902
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Estlin, Mary Anne
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1812-1890
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Weston, Anne Warren
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Weston, Anne Warren
  • Estlin, Mary Anne
  • Estlin, J. B.
  • Brown, William Wells
  • Massie, Isabella
  • Scoble, John
  • American Anti-Slavery Society
  • Free Church of Scotland
  • Abolitionists
  • Anti-slavery fairs
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertomydearmi00estl13
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Mary Anne Estlin writes that her father, John Bishop Estlin, is still incapacitated by illness. She thanks Anne Warren Weston for allowing her and her father to see the Anne W. Weston's correspondence with Miss Wigham about the objections raised by the Glasgow abolitionists to the attacks on the Free Church and the Bible by the American anti-slavery lecturers. It is hard to explain the structure of the American Anti-Slavery Society to the English and Scottish abolitionists. Mary A. Estlin comments that "nothing analoguous has ever been experienced in this country under their observation." Mary A. Estlin longs for Anne W. Weston to be here to answer the criticisms of the Glasgow people in person, or failing that, to submit a written explanation of her views. The British contribution to the Boston bazaar may decline, although Bristol's donations are maintained. Mary A. Estlin is busy with the preparation and exhibition of the box for Boston. Included in the box will be letters about the effect of the Glasgow circular. She mentions letters by Mrs. Massie who is critical of John Scoble. On Mary A. Estlin's list are 24 names of anti-slavery correspondents. She suggests that these names could be inserted in William Wells Brown's Description of His Panorama of American Slavery. She tells of an appeal that Mary A. Estlin's father had been preparing for William W. Brown. Mary A. Estlin call attention to a life of a Welsh bard, copies of which are being sent to the bazaar, which contains "a very strong anti-slavery lesson." She tells of the place that Anne Warren Weston has in Mary A. Estlin's mind and affection since hearing so much about her from her sisters
Extent
1 online resource (3 leaves (10 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] My dear Miss Weston
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertomydearmi00estl13
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Mary Anne Estlin writes that her father, John Bishop Estlin, is still incapacitated by illness. She thanks Anne Warren Weston for allowing her and her father to see the Anne W. Weston's correspondence with Miss Wigham about the objections raised by the Glasgow abolitionists to the attacks on the Free Church and the Bible by the American anti-slavery lecturers. It is hard to explain the structure of the American Anti-Slavery Society to the English and Scottish abolitionists. Mary A. Estlin comments that "nothing analoguous has ever been experienced in this country under their observation." Mary A. Estlin longs for Anne W. Weston to be here to answer the criticisms of the Glasgow people in person, or failing that, to submit a written explanation of her views. The British contribution to the Boston bazaar may decline, although Bristol's donations are maintained. Mary A. Estlin is busy with the preparation and exhibition of the box for Boston. Included in the box will be letters about the effect of the Glasgow circular. She mentions letters by Mrs. Massie who is critical of John Scoble. On Mary A. Estlin's list are 24 names of anti-slavery correspondents. She suggests that these names could be inserted in William Wells Brown's Description of His Panorama of American Slavery. She tells of an appeal that Mary A. Estlin's father had been preparing for William W. Brown. Mary A. Estlin call attention to a life of a Welsh bard, copies of which are being sent to the bazaar, which contains "a very strong anti-slavery lesson." She tells of the place that Anne Warren Weston has in Mary A. Estlin's mind and affection since hearing so much about her from her sisters
Extent
1 online resource (3 leaves (10 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

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