The Resource [Letter to] My dear M. W. Chapman & sisters

[Letter to] My dear M. W. Chapman & sisters

Label
[Letter to] My dear M. W. Chapman & sisters
Title
[Letter to] My dear M. W. Chapman & sisters
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1793-1880
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Mott, Lucretia
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1806-1885
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Chapman, Maria Weston
  • Weston
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Chapman, Maria Weston
  • Mott, Lucretia
  • Weston
  • Clay, Cassius Marcellus
  • Douglass, Frederick
  • Garrison, William Lloyd
  • Weston, Caroline
  • British and Foreign Anti-slavery Society
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] My dear M. W. Chapman & sisters
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Lucretia Mott asks Maria Weston Chapman to invite Caroline Weston and her sisters to come to the annual meeting at Kennett and to stay at Mott's house. Edmund Quincy is also invited to stay there. Lucretia Mott remarks on the prospects of William Garrison's influence in England. The disposition to hear and receive Frederick Douglass at the British & Foreign Anti-Slavery Society's meeting "seemed a little evidence of repentance at their past mis-doings." Lucretia Mott would have preferred that the Standard be less severe in its treatment of this society. Lucretia Mott desires gentle dealings "even with poor C[assius] M. Clay---so lamentably fallen & degraded." She remembers his anti-pacifistic utterances. Clay's paper reaches many in the south, where "the anti-slavery there is in the True American might do good, as they would see it no where else," therefore Lucretia Mott would have the paper continue to circulate. On the other hand, "those who descend from the higher position which we occupy, & unite with these "worlds' people,' need to be 'withstood to the face, because they are to be blamed'--- ..." Lucretia Mott asks why Wendell Phillips cannot come
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] My dear M. W. Chapman & sisters
Link
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Lucretia Mott asks Maria Weston Chapman to invite Caroline Weston and her sisters to come to the annual meeting at Kennett and to stay at Mott's house. Edmund Quincy is also invited to stay there. Lucretia Mott remarks on the prospects of William Garrison's influence in England. The disposition to hear and receive Frederick Douglass at the British & Foreign Anti-Slavery Society's meeting "seemed a little evidence of repentance at their past mis-doings." Lucretia Mott would have preferred that the Standard be less severe in its treatment of this society. Lucretia Mott desires gentle dealings "even with poor C[assius] M. Clay---so lamentably fallen & degraded." She remembers his anti-pacifistic utterances. Clay's paper reaches many in the south, where "the anti-slavery there is in the True American might do good, as they would see it no where else," therefore Lucretia Mott would have the paper continue to circulate. On the other hand, "those who descend from the higher position which we occupy, & unite with these "worlds' people,' need to be 'withstood to the face, because they are to be blamed'--- ..." Lucretia Mott asks why Wendell Phillips cannot come
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

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