The Resource [Letter to] My dear Henry

[Letter to] My dear Henry

Label
[Letter to] My dear Henry
Title
[Letter to] My dear Henry
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
Citation location within source
v.1, no.206
Citation source
Merrill, Walter M. Letters of William Lloyd Garrison
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1805-1879
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Garrison, William Lloyd
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1814-1837
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Benson, Henry Egbert
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Garrison, William Lloyd
  • Benson, Henry Egbert
  • Burleigh, Charles C.
  • Child, David Lee
  • Garrison, James Holley
  • Knapp, Isaac
  • May, Samuel J.
  • Thompson, George
  • Antislavery movements
  • Abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] My dear Henry
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertomydearhe00garr3
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • The bundle of newspapers sent by way of David Lee Child were not received by William Lloyd Garrison. Garrison comments on the housekeeping abilities of Henry Egbert Benson and Isaac Knapp. Garrison regrets George Thompson's decision to visit Plymouth. Public addresses are often risky, but publications are profitable to the cause. Garrison writes: "By the bye, Bostonians have a strong patriotic attachment for Faneuil Hall; and we shall raise a blush of shame upon their cheeks, ere long, by dwelling continually upon the disgrace which has been cast upon it by a pro-slavery meeting." Garrison praises Samuel Joseph May, who has recently recovered from an illness. There was no meeting in Promfret, but a group of six people had a talk by the steps of the meetinghouse. Charles Burleigh talked at length to a young slaveholder who came to Promfret to hear William Lloyd Garrison. Garrison asks if brother James (Holley Garrison) has sailed from Boston
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] My dear Henry
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertomydearhe00garr3
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • The bundle of newspapers sent by way of David Lee Child were not received by William Lloyd Garrison. Garrison comments on the housekeeping abilities of Henry Egbert Benson and Isaac Knapp. Garrison regrets George Thompson's decision to visit Plymouth. Public addresses are often risky, but publications are profitable to the cause. Garrison writes: "By the bye, Bostonians have a strong patriotic attachment for Faneuil Hall; and we shall raise a blush of shame upon their cheeks, ere long, by dwelling continually upon the disgrace which has been cast upon it by a pro-slavery meeting." Garrison praises Samuel Joseph May, who has recently recovered from an illness. There was no meeting in Promfret, but a group of six people had a talk by the steps of the meetinghouse. Charles Burleigh talked at length to a young slaveholder who came to Promfret to hear William Lloyd Garrison. Garrison asks if brother James (Holley Garrison) has sailed from Boston
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

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