The Resource [Letter to] My dear Friend

[Letter to] My dear Friend

Label
[Letter to] My dear Friend
Title
[Letter to] My dear Friend
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1805-1872
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Webb, Richard Davis
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1806-1885
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Chapman, Maria Weston
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Chapman, Maria Weston
  • Webb, Richard Davis
  • Wigham, Eliza
  • Abolitionists
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
  • Europe
Label
[Letter to] My dear Friend
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Richard Davis Webb tells about his wife opening the "Box of [Liberty] Bells." Jane and Eliza Wigham were present and undertook the distribution of the Liberty Bells to Scotland and the north of England. Webb discusses the prospect of Maria Weston Chapman coming to the British Isles. Webb writes: "Dublin is a poor city, Ireland a poor country, and we are no great things ourselves---(though we might not like the people to say so)---but whatever we are we shall be most heartily glad to see you." Webb sends messages to Samuel May, Jr., and Henry C. Wright. He asks Maria W. Chapman to discontinue the Liberator for three Englishmen. He thinks it likely that some of them were "horrified by an article in the last number about Watt's Hymns' which was by no means orthodox." Webb comments on the political situation in Europe. He looks with impatience to the next American mail "for my share of the Annual Budget."
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] My dear Friend
Link
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Richard Davis Webb tells about his wife opening the "Box of [Liberty] Bells." Jane and Eliza Wigham were present and undertook the distribution of the Liberty Bells to Scotland and the north of England. Webb discusses the prospect of Maria Weston Chapman coming to the British Isles. Webb writes: "Dublin is a poor city, Ireland a poor country, and we are no great things ourselves---(though we might not like the people to say so)---but whatever we are we shall be most heartily glad to see you." Webb sends messages to Samuel May, Jr., and Henry C. Wright. He asks Maria W. Chapman to discontinue the Liberator for three Englishmen. He thinks it likely that some of them were "horrified by an article in the last number about Watt's Hymns' which was by no means orthodox." Webb comments on the political situation in Europe. He looks with impatience to the next American mail "for my share of the Annual Budget."
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

  • Internet ArchiveBorrow it
    300 Funston Ave, San Francisco, CA, 94118, US
    37.7823215 -122.4716373

Library Links

Processing Feedback ...