The Resource [Letter to] My Dear Friend

[Letter to] My Dear Friend

Label
[Letter to] My Dear Friend
Title
[Letter to] My Dear Friend
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1805-1879
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Garrison, William Lloyd
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1807-1897
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Nichol, Elizabeth Pease
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Garrison, William Lloyd
  • Nichol, Elizabeth Pease
  • Garrison, George T,
  • Garrison, William Lloyd
  • Lawrence, Woods M.
  • Villard, Henry
  • Wigham, Eliza
  • Wigham, Jane
  • Woods, Leonard
  • Woods, Leonard
  • Fires
  • Antislavery movements
  • Abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] My Dear Friend
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertomydearfr1873garr
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • William Lloyd Garrison says he should have written Mrs. Elizabeth Pease Nichol sooner. He reminisces about his visit to Mrs. Nichol's home in Edinburgh and regrets the absence of Jane and Eliza Wigham at the time. Garrison tells about Mrs. M. Woods Lawrence, who knew the Wighams. Mrs. M. Woods Lawrence's father was the late Rev. Woods Leonard, a professor at the Andover Theological Institution, and her brother, Leonard Woods, was a Southern sympathizer during the Civil War and formerly the president of Bowdoin College. Garrison mentions the death of Mrs. Ritchie, the widow of the Rev. Dr. Ritchie. He was glad that Mrs. Nichol received the stereoscopic views of the ruins left by the Boston fire of 1872. This winter has been the coldest that Garrison has ever known. George Thompson Garrison and William Lloyd Garrison Jr. lost their property in the fire. William Lloyd Garrison has been in poor health. He tells about Mr. and Mrs. Henry Villard. Henry Villard is troubled by "distracting noises in his head which have thus far defied all medical skill." Garrison thanks Mrs. Nichol for the copy of the "Life and Writings of Mazzini" and also the notorious volume, "Medical Women," by Miss Jex-Blake
Extent
1 online resource (3 leaves (10 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] My Dear Friend
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertomydearfr1873garr
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • William Lloyd Garrison says he should have written Mrs. Elizabeth Pease Nichol sooner. He reminisces about his visit to Mrs. Nichol's home in Edinburgh and regrets the absence of Jane and Eliza Wigham at the time. Garrison tells about Mrs. M. Woods Lawrence, who knew the Wighams. Mrs. M. Woods Lawrence's father was the late Rev. Woods Leonard, a professor at the Andover Theological Institution, and her brother, Leonard Woods, was a Southern sympathizer during the Civil War and formerly the president of Bowdoin College. Garrison mentions the death of Mrs. Ritchie, the widow of the Rev. Dr. Ritchie. He was glad that Mrs. Nichol received the stereoscopic views of the ruins left by the Boston fire of 1872. This winter has been the coldest that Garrison has ever known. George Thompson Garrison and William Lloyd Garrison Jr. lost their property in the fire. William Lloyd Garrison has been in poor health. He tells about Mr. and Mrs. Henry Villard. Henry Villard is troubled by "distracting noises in his head which have thus far defied all medical skill." Garrison thanks Mrs. Nichol for the copy of the "Life and Writings of Mazzini" and also the notorious volume, "Medical Women," by Miss Jex-Blake
Extent
1 online resource (3 leaves (10 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

  • Internet ArchiveBorrow it
    300 Funston Ave, San Francisco, CA, 94118, US
    37.7823215 -122.4716373

Library Links

Processing Feedback ...