The Resource [Letter to] My Dear Friend

[Letter to] My Dear Friend

Label
[Letter to] My Dear Friend
Title
[Letter to] My Dear Friend
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1818-1895
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Douglass, Frederick
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1806-1885
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Chapman, Maria Weston
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Chapman, Maria Weston
  • Douglass, Frederick
  • Collins, John A.
  • Remond, Charles Lenox
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] My Dear Friend
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Frederick Douglass wants to make his position clear in regard to the incident at Syracuse. Conflicting notices were given of a "property convention" and of an anti-slavery meeting for the same afternoon. The next day, before the adjournment of the morning session, Douglass announced the afternoon anti-slavery meeting. Whereupon John A. Collins announced a property meeting and made a speech, referring to the "bigotry and narrowmindedness abolitionists," etc. Charles L. Remond replied, expressing "the belief that the Board of Managers could not sanction him [Collins] as their general agent." Then Collins read documents complimentary to himself, and presented four propositions, which Frederick Douglass quotes to the effect that the universal reform movement will benefit the slave more than the anti-slavery movement alone. In the afternoon meeting, Frederick Douglass posed the question of "whether it was just or honorable for Mr. Collins to labor in the one [cause] for the distruction [sic] of the other." And closed by saying that if the Board sanctioned Mr. Collins's course, Douglass felt it was his duty to resign his agency for carrying out the plan of the hundred conventions
  • In the postscript, Frederick Douglass asks Maria Weston Chapman to provide his wife with $25 or $30
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] My Dear Friend
Link
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Frederick Douglass wants to make his position clear in regard to the incident at Syracuse. Conflicting notices were given of a "property convention" and of an anti-slavery meeting for the same afternoon. The next day, before the adjournment of the morning session, Douglass announced the afternoon anti-slavery meeting. Whereupon John A. Collins announced a property meeting and made a speech, referring to the "bigotry and narrowmindedness abolitionists," etc. Charles L. Remond replied, expressing "the belief that the Board of Managers could not sanction him [Collins] as their general agent." Then Collins read documents complimentary to himself, and presented four propositions, which Frederick Douglass quotes to the effect that the universal reform movement will benefit the slave more than the anti-slavery movement alone. In the afternoon meeting, Frederick Douglass posed the question of "whether it was just or honorable for Mr. Collins to labor in the one [cause] for the distruction [sic] of the other." And closed by saying that if the Board sanctioned Mr. Collins's course, Douglass felt it was his duty to resign his agency for carrying out the plan of the hundred conventions
  • In the postscript, Frederick Douglass asks Maria Weston Chapman to provide his wife with $25 or $30
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

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    300 Funston Ave, San Francisco, CA, 94118, US
    37.7823215 -122.4716373

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