The Resource [Letter to] Esteemed Friends, Henry G. & Maria Weston Chapman

[Letter to] Esteemed Friends, Henry G. & Maria Weston Chapman

Label
[Letter to] Esteemed Friends, Henry G. & Maria Weston Chapman
Title
[Letter to] Esteemed Friends, Henry G. & Maria Weston Chapman
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Sturge, Thomas
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
  • 1804-1842
  • 1806-1885
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Chapman, Henry Grafton
  • Chapman, Maria Weston
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Chapman, Maria Weston
  • Chapman, Henry Grafton
  • Sturge, Thomas
  • Collins, John A.
  • British and Foreign Anti-slavery Society
  • Abolitionists
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] Esteemed Friends, Henry G. & Maria Weston Chapman
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed. Oversized manuscript
  • In reply to Mr. & Mrs. Chapman's query in their letter of Feb. 22, 1841, Thomas Sturge explains the English custom of cooperating in philanthropic enterprises, without making particular religious affiliations a condition. He discourses on the importance of free labor industries in furthering the suppression of slavery. Cotton manufacturers wish to get free labor cotton from India and not to depend on America. The Association for the Civilization of Africa uses only such measures as Thomas Sturge, who is "a friend & lover of peace can cordially unite with." He believes the natives are to be encouraged to raise cotton "to supersede slave grown cotton of America." Thomas Sturge explains the treatment in England of John A. Collins. John A. Collins arrived at "an unhappy period" when many members of the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society united with the American & Foreign Anti-Slavery Society in their views, not "being aware that they by so acting might obstruct the usefullness of women." He believes "such persons to have been deceived." Thomas Sturge disapproves of the refusal to partake of the sacrament with Christians "not yet convinced of the sin of slavery." He mentions the "unkind & uncalled for opposition" to Collins from Captain Stewart. He also discusses Collin's poor health and the mistake of sending him alone
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] Esteemed Friends, Henry G. & Maria Weston Chapman
Link
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed. Oversized manuscript
  • In reply to Mr. & Mrs. Chapman's query in their letter of Feb. 22, 1841, Thomas Sturge explains the English custom of cooperating in philanthropic enterprises, without making particular religious affiliations a condition. He discourses on the importance of free labor industries in furthering the suppression of slavery. Cotton manufacturers wish to get free labor cotton from India and not to depend on America. The Association for the Civilization of Africa uses only such measures as Thomas Sturge, who is "a friend & lover of peace can cordially unite with." He believes the natives are to be encouraged to raise cotton "to supersede slave grown cotton of America." Thomas Sturge explains the treatment in England of John A. Collins. John A. Collins arrived at "an unhappy period" when many members of the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society united with the American & Foreign Anti-Slavery Society in their views, not "being aware that they by so acting might obstruct the usefullness of women." He believes "such persons to have been deceived." Thomas Sturge disapproves of the refusal to partake of the sacrament with Christians "not yet convinced of the sin of slavery." He mentions the "unkind & uncalled for opposition" to Collins from Captain Stewart. He also discusses Collin's poor health and the mistake of sending him alone
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

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