The Resource [Letter to] Dear Mrs. Chapman

[Letter to] Dear Mrs. Chapman

Label
[Letter to] Dear Mrs. Chapman
Title
[Letter to] Dear Mrs. Chapman
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1805-1872
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Webb, Richard Davis
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1806-1885
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Chapman, Maria Weston
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Chapman, Maria Weston
  • Webb, Richard Davis
  • Cabot, Susan
  • Chamerovzow, Louis Alexis
  • Chapman, Edwin
  • Craft, Ellen
  • Craft, William
  • Follen, Eliza Lee Cabot
  • Garrison, William Lloyd
  • Hilditch, Sarah
  • Martineau, Harriet
  • M'Kim, J. Miller
  • Nichol, Elizabeth Pease
  • Powell, William P
  • Stowe, C. E.
  • Stowe, Harriet Beecher
  • Sturge, Joseph
  • Thompson, George
  • Webb, Alfred
  • American Anti-Slavery Society
  • British and Foreign Anti-slavery Society
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] Dear Mrs. Chapman
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertodearmrsc00webb16
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Richard Davis Webb tells about his son's embarkation on a ship bound for Australia. Alfred Webb was going on the voyage for his health. He mentions William Lloyd Garrison's voyage to England in 1840 and his cool reception by the Gurneys, etc. Richard D. Webb tells how he came to meet Harriet Martineau. He discusses at length the Australian voyage and Alfred's fellow passengers, the consignment of merchandise for sale, and the arrangements for paying for his passage. He discusses the relations of Joseph Sturge with the American Anti-Slavery Society. The British public thinks well of Sturge's abolitionism. Webb likes L. A. Chamerovzow, who is having trouble winning over the Committee of the British & Foreign Anti-Slavery Society to an alliance with the American abolitionists. Webb met George Thompson in London. Joseph Sturge was pleased with Calvin Ellis Stowe's speech at the annual meeting of the British & Foreign Anti-Slavery Society. Professor Stowe repeated his speech at a meeting of the Free Labor Produce Association. Webb comments on the value of the National Anti-Slavery Standard and the Anti-Slavery Advocate. He discusses the cost of printing the Advocate. Webb asked W. Tweedie about the Advocate's chances of survival. Tweedie said they were poor. Webb likes James Miller M'Kim very much. He met the Estlins, Sarah Pugh, and others in London. William and Ellen Craft intend to run a lodging house. Webb writes that "there is that witty man W. P. Powell and his family who have emigrated from N. York to Liverpool and are getting on respectably there." Webb's daughters met Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe. Mrs. Eliza Lee Cabot Follen asked Richard D. Webb if she could visit him. Susan Cabot has just recovered from a long illness. Charles Follen is a very pleasing young man. Webb mentions a great National Exhibition. Webb hopes to hear from Caroline Weston. He tells about the Hilditch sisters, Sarah and Blanche. He heard a rumor that Elizabeth Pease is going to marry Professor Nichol of Glasgow
  • Pages five and six of this manuscript have been mutilated and only a fragment remains
Extent
1 online resource (3 leaves (12 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] Dear Mrs. Chapman
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertodearmrsc00webb16
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Richard Davis Webb tells about his son's embarkation on a ship bound for Australia. Alfred Webb was going on the voyage for his health. He mentions William Lloyd Garrison's voyage to England in 1840 and his cool reception by the Gurneys, etc. Richard D. Webb tells how he came to meet Harriet Martineau. He discusses at length the Australian voyage and Alfred's fellow passengers, the consignment of merchandise for sale, and the arrangements for paying for his passage. He discusses the relations of Joseph Sturge with the American Anti-Slavery Society. The British public thinks well of Sturge's abolitionism. Webb likes L. A. Chamerovzow, who is having trouble winning over the Committee of the British & Foreign Anti-Slavery Society to an alliance with the American abolitionists. Webb met George Thompson in London. Joseph Sturge was pleased with Calvin Ellis Stowe's speech at the annual meeting of the British & Foreign Anti-Slavery Society. Professor Stowe repeated his speech at a meeting of the Free Labor Produce Association. Webb comments on the value of the National Anti-Slavery Standard and the Anti-Slavery Advocate. He discusses the cost of printing the Advocate. Webb asked W. Tweedie about the Advocate's chances of survival. Tweedie said they were poor. Webb likes James Miller M'Kim very much. He met the Estlins, Sarah Pugh, and others in London. William and Ellen Craft intend to run a lodging house. Webb writes that "there is that witty man W. P. Powell and his family who have emigrated from N. York to Liverpool and are getting on respectably there." Webb's daughters met Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe. Mrs. Eliza Lee Cabot Follen asked Richard D. Webb if she could visit him. Susan Cabot has just recovered from a long illness. Charles Follen is a very pleasing young man. Webb mentions a great National Exhibition. Webb hopes to hear from Caroline Weston. He tells about the Hilditch sisters, Sarah and Blanche. He heard a rumor that Elizabeth Pease is going to marry Professor Nichol of Glasgow
  • Pages five and six of this manuscript have been mutilated and only a fragment remains
Extent
1 online resource (3 leaves (12 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

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