The Resource [Letter to] Dear Debora[h]

[Letter to] Dear Debora[h]

Label
[Letter to] Dear Debora[h]
Title
[Letter to] Dear Debora[h]
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1812-1890
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Weston, Anne Warren
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
b.1814
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Weston, Deborah
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Weston, Anne Warren
  • Weston, Deborah
  • Chapman, Maria Weston
  • Phillips, Wendell
  • Benson, Henry Egbert
  • Root, David
  • Williams, Robert
  • Chaplin, William L.
  • Thacher, Moses
  • Dresser, Amos
  • Loring, Ellis Gray
  • Garrison, William Lloyd
  • Stanton, Henry B.
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] Dear Debora[h]
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertodeardebo00west64
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Anne Warren Weston describes the Anti-Slavery meeting which was held in the stable-loft of the Marlborough Hotel. Garrison read the Annual Report, which was a "most masterly production." Moses Thacher stated that he had received a letter from "a lady" who had been a slave, indicating that "it was one of the women who ran away from the [Boston] Court House." Other speakers were "Brother [Samuel J.] May," Mr. Cyrus Pitt Grosvenor, Henry Brewster Stanton, and [William Lawrence?] Chaplin. More than a thousand were present and many could not get in. Amos Dresser told "the Nashville story. He is a small delicate, pretty looking young man... Great sobbing was heard all over the room." Anne also describes the evening meeting at the State House. After Orange Scott, Ellis Gray Loring spoke in his "little happy quiet soft way." First describing [Thomas] Clarkson, he spoke of Garrison--"...this brought down a tremendous clap, interspersed with a few hisses." Henry B. Stanton made a speech on slavery in the District of Columbia. "It was one of those Free Discussion flourishes, in which his soul so much delights." Mr. Dresser retold his story, because the audience clamored for his immediate appearance. "He was clapped uproariously." Anne describes the meeting the next morning, again in the stable. Mr. [David] Root, Mr. Philemon R. Russell, Amasa Walker, and Mr. [Charles] Fitch spoke. Then Robert Williams, a black man living in Boston told his story, of which part of "the scene was laid in Weymouth." The problem of a building for free discussion and the Free Church were discussed. The Free Church was turned out of Congress Hall for allowing the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society to go in. The Ladies' Anti-Slavery meeting was held at the Artists' Gallery. Mrs. Lydia Maria Child dined at the house of Mrs. Maria Weston Chapman. Anne describes the ladies' meeting. Some villains had thrown Cayenne pepper into the stove, which made the audience cough. The [Ladies'] Society pledged $100 to New York. Anne describes the guests and conversation at Mrs. Chapman's. At the next morning's meeting, "a eulogium had been passed on Henry Benson, which had drowned the whole audience in tears." Anne describes the evening party at her house. Tells of the "Monthly Concert," which Wendell Phillips attended. "He is beginning to be quite an Abolitionist."
  • There is cross writing on the first page that is very difficult to read
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] Dear Debora[h]
Link
https://archive.org/details/lettertodeardebo00west64
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Anne Warren Weston describes the Anti-Slavery meeting which was held in the stable-loft of the Marlborough Hotel. Garrison read the Annual Report, which was a "most masterly production." Moses Thacher stated that he had received a letter from "a lady" who had been a slave, indicating that "it was one of the women who ran away from the [Boston] Court House." Other speakers were "Brother [Samuel J.] May," Mr. Cyrus Pitt Grosvenor, Henry Brewster Stanton, and [William Lawrence?] Chaplin. More than a thousand were present and many could not get in. Amos Dresser told "the Nashville story. He is a small delicate, pretty looking young man... Great sobbing was heard all over the room." Anne also describes the evening meeting at the State House. After Orange Scott, Ellis Gray Loring spoke in his "little happy quiet soft way." First describing [Thomas] Clarkson, he spoke of Garrison--"...this brought down a tremendous clap, interspersed with a few hisses." Henry B. Stanton made a speech on slavery in the District of Columbia. "It was one of those Free Discussion flourishes, in which his soul so much delights." Mr. Dresser retold his story, because the audience clamored for his immediate appearance. "He was clapped uproariously." Anne describes the meeting the next morning, again in the stable. Mr. [David] Root, Mr. Philemon R. Russell, Amasa Walker, and Mr. [Charles] Fitch spoke. Then Robert Williams, a black man living in Boston told his story, of which part of "the scene was laid in Weymouth." The problem of a building for free discussion and the Free Church were discussed. The Free Church was turned out of Congress Hall for allowing the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society to go in. The Ladies' Anti-Slavery meeting was held at the Artists' Gallery. Mrs. Lydia Maria Child dined at the house of Mrs. Maria Weston Chapman. Anne describes the ladies' meeting. Some villains had thrown Cayenne pepper into the stove, which made the audience cough. The [Ladies'] Society pledged $100 to New York. Anne describes the guests and conversation at Mrs. Chapman's. At the next morning's meeting, "a eulogium had been passed on Henry Benson, which had drowned the whole audience in tears." Anne describes the evening party at her house. Tells of the "Monthly Concert," which Wendell Phillips attended. "He is beginning to be quite an Abolitionist."
  • There is cross writing on the first page that is very difficult to read
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

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    300 Funston Ave, San Francisco, CA, 94118, US
    37.7823215 -122.4716373

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