The Resource [Letter to] Dear Anne

[Letter to] Dear Anne

Label
[Letter to] Dear Anne
Title
[Letter to] Dear Anne
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
b.1814
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Weston, Deborah
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1812-1890
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Weston, Anne Warren
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Weston, Deborah
  • Weston, Anne Warren
  • Alcott, Abba May
  • Benson, Henry Egbert
  • Row, George L. L
  • Child, David Lee
  • Child
  • Knapp, Isaac
  • Mack, David
  • Mack, Maria
  • May, Samuel J.
  • Smith, Mary
  • Stanton, Henry B.
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Letter to] Dear Anne
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Deborah Weston mentions the death of Harriet Hunt, mail and papers for George Thompson, a new student named Rhodes, and a visit by Mr. & Mrs. David Mack. Deborah refers to Garrison's troubles with Isaac Knapp. She identifies Sarah Thaxter as being the same person known as Sally Thaxter. Deborah gives a lot of family news. She says that Ellis Gray Loring's mother is the most talkative person she has every met. Mrs. Loring told her that Mr. & Mrs. David Lee Child went to West Boylston. Deborah describes a baptism at Mr. Ides' church. She talks about a notice of an anti-slavery meeting. She heard Henry B. Stanton's lecture. Mrs. A. Bronson Alcott reported on the popular reaction to the notice of the meeting. Rev. Samuel J. May spoke of abolition at a church. He told the story of Mary Smith, a black woman, who was shipwrecked and later returned to Massachusetts by the state of North Carolina. Theodore S. Wright and Henry B. Stanton also spoke. Deborah criticizes Stanton's speech. Stanton praised "Right and Wrong [in Boston]." Zebedee Cook and Henry Rice berated the sexton of Dr. Channing's church for issuing a notice of an anti-slavery meeting. She tells about a hymnal ordered from Knopf, news of the Ammidon family, Rev. Samuel J. May, and the custards which came from Weymouth. In the postscript, Deborah writes that Mrs. Gilman is coming north to test the sincerity of the abolitionists
  • Also with the Call No. Ms.A.9.2 v.8, p.5, is a receipt: "Received of Henry E. Benson Three 50/100 Dollars for services at the Anti-Slavery office the first week in Jan'y 1836--$3.50." It is signed by "Geo. L. L. Row."
Extent
1 online resource (2 leaves (8 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to] Dear Anne
Link
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • Deborah Weston mentions the death of Harriet Hunt, mail and papers for George Thompson, a new student named Rhodes, and a visit by Mr. & Mrs. David Mack. Deborah refers to Garrison's troubles with Isaac Knapp. She identifies Sarah Thaxter as being the same person known as Sally Thaxter. Deborah gives a lot of family news. She says that Ellis Gray Loring's mother is the most talkative person she has every met. Mrs. Loring told her that Mr. & Mrs. David Lee Child went to West Boylston. Deborah describes a baptism at Mr. Ides' church. She talks about a notice of an anti-slavery meeting. She heard Henry B. Stanton's lecture. Mrs. A. Bronson Alcott reported on the popular reaction to the notice of the meeting. Rev. Samuel J. May spoke of abolition at a church. He told the story of Mary Smith, a black woman, who was shipwrecked and later returned to Massachusetts by the state of North Carolina. Theodore S. Wright and Henry B. Stanton also spoke. Deborah criticizes Stanton's speech. Stanton praised "Right and Wrong [in Boston]." Zebedee Cook and Henry Rice berated the sexton of Dr. Channing's church for issuing a notice of an anti-slavery meeting. She tells about a hymnal ordered from Knopf, news of the Ammidon family, Rev. Samuel J. May, and the custards which came from Weymouth. In the postscript, Deborah writes that Mrs. Gilman is coming north to test the sincerity of the abolitionists
  • Also with the Call No. Ms.A.9.2 v.8, p.5, is a receipt: "Received of Henry E. Benson Three 50/100 Dollars for services at the Anti-Slavery office the first week in Jan'y 1836--$3.50." It is signed by "Geo. L. L. Row."
Extent
1 online resource (2 leaves (8 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

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    37.7823215 -122.4716373

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