The Resource [Letter to Anne Warren Weston]

[Letter to Anne Warren Weston]

Label
[Letter to Anne Warren Weston]
Title
[Letter to Anne Warren Weston]
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1788-1868
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Mott, James
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1812-1890
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Weston, Anne Warren
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Weston, Anne Warren
  • Mott, James
  • Mott, Lucretia
  • Chapman, Maria Weston
  • Foster, Abby Kelley
  • Parrish, Joseph
  • Pennsylvania Hall (Philadelphia, Pa.)
  • Abolitionists
  • Racism
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Letter to Anne Warren Weston]
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • On pages 1-2 of this manuscript, there is a letter by James Mott to Anne Warren Weston. James Mott was relieved of anxiety upon receiving Anne Warren Weston's letter with the news of Maria Weston Chapman's convalescence. James Mott refers to a New England convention in which Abby Kelley [Foster] took a prominent role, and he remarks on the jealous guarding of prerogatives by the gentlemen abolitionists. He briefly mentions the burning of Pennsylvania Hall. Some of "our timid friends" have been upset by the resolution passed by the women's convention regarding the duty of abolitionists to associate with black Americans. The opponents of the resolution want black people to issue a disclaimer in order to forestall further hostile actions. James Mott thinks the opposition is based on prejudice against color
  • On page 3 of this manuscript, there is a separate letter by Lucretia Mott to Anne Warren Weston. Lucretia Mott wants to remove the impression that "any of our thorough Anti-Slavery friends are turning back & discouraging the colored people from cooperating with our movements ..." It is only half-way abolitionists, like Dr. [Joseph?] Parrish who are "now quaking with fear." Lucretia Mott has already called the black people together for the purpose of protesting against "such intercourse as that resolution contemplated."
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Letter to Anne Warren Weston]
Link
Publication
Note
  • Holograph, signed
  • On pages 1-2 of this manuscript, there is a letter by James Mott to Anne Warren Weston. James Mott was relieved of anxiety upon receiving Anne Warren Weston's letter with the news of Maria Weston Chapman's convalescence. James Mott refers to a New England convention in which Abby Kelley [Foster] took a prominent role, and he remarks on the jealous guarding of prerogatives by the gentlemen abolitionists. He briefly mentions the burning of Pennsylvania Hall. Some of "our timid friends" have been upset by the resolution passed by the women's convention regarding the duty of abolitionists to associate with black Americans. The opponents of the resolution want black people to issue a disclaimer in order to forestall further hostile actions. James Mott thinks the opposition is based on prejudice against color
  • On page 3 of this manuscript, there is a separate letter by Lucretia Mott to Anne Warren Weston. Lucretia Mott wants to remove the impression that "any of our thorough Anti-Slavery friends are turning back & discouraging the colored people from cooperating with our movements ..." It is only half-way abolitionists, like Dr. [Joseph?] Parrish who are "now quaking with fear." Lucretia Mott has already called the black people together for the purpose of protesting against "such intercourse as that resolution contemplated."
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

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