The Resource Is there a right to remain silent? : coercive interrogation and the Fifth Amendment after 9/11, Alan M. Dershowitz

Is there a right to remain silent? : coercive interrogation and the Fifth Amendment after 9/11, Alan M. Dershowitz

Label
Is there a right to remain silent? : coercive interrogation and the Fifth Amendment after 9/11
Title
Is there a right to remain silent?
Title remainder
coercive interrogation and the Fifth Amendment after 9/11
Statement of responsibility
Alan M. Dershowitz
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Dershowitz, Alan M
Dewey number
345.73/056
Index
index present
LC call number
KF9668
LC item number
.D47 2008
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Inalienable rights series
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Self-incrimination
  • United States.
  • United States
  • Right to counsel
  • Police questioning
  • Civil rights
Label
Is there a right to remain silent? : coercive interrogation and the Fifth Amendment after 9/11, Alan M. Dershowitz
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [177]-204) and index
Contents
What is the right against self-incrimination? -- The Supreme Court's recent decision -- The limits of textual analysis in constitutional interpretation -- The limits of precedent: which way does the "immunity" analogy cut? -- The limits of historical inquiry -- The privilege over time -- The relevance of constitutional policies underlying the right -- A matter of interpretation -- Conclusion: The case for a vibrant privilege in the preventive state
Extent
1 online resource (xx, 212 pages)
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)870243781
Label
Is there a right to remain silent? : coercive interrogation and the Fifth Amendment after 9/11, Alan M. Dershowitz
Link
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [177]-204) and index
Contents
What is the right against self-incrimination? -- The Supreme Court's recent decision -- The limits of textual analysis in constitutional interpretation -- The limits of precedent: which way does the "immunity" analogy cut? -- The limits of historical inquiry -- The privilege over time -- The relevance of constitutional policies underlying the right -- A matter of interpretation -- Conclusion: The case for a vibrant privilege in the preventive state
Extent
1 online resource (xx, 212 pages)
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)870243781

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