The Resource Interactive computer graphics : a top-down approach with OpenGL, Edward Angel

Interactive computer graphics : a top-down approach with OpenGL, Edward Angel

Label
Interactive computer graphics : a top-down approach with OpenGL
Title
Interactive computer graphics
Title remainder
a top-down approach with OpenGL
Statement of responsibility
Edward Angel
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Graphics systems and models. Graphics programming. Input and interaction. Geometric objects and transformations. Viewing, shading. Implementation of a renderer. Hierarchical and object-oriented graphics ..
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Angel, Edward
Dewey number
006.6
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
T385
LC item number
.A514 2000
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Computer graphics
  • Interactive computer systems
  • Computer graphics
  • Interactive computer systems
  • Computergraphics
  • Computergrafik
  • Dialogsystem
  • Infographie
  • Infographie
  • Systèmes conversationnels (informatique)
Label
Interactive computer graphics : a top-down approach with OpenGL, Edward Angel
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 2
  • 42
  • 2.2
  • OpenGL API
  • 43
  • 2.2.1
  • Graphics Functions
  • 44
  • 2.2.2
  • OpenGL Interface
  • 45
  • 1.1.2
  • 2.3
  • Primitives and Attributes
  • 46
  • 2.3.1
  • Polygon Basics
  • 47
  • 2.3.2
  • Polygon Types in OpenGL
  • 49
  • 2.3.3
  • Design
  • Text
  • 50
  • 2.3.4
  • Curved Objects
  • 51
  • 2.3.5
  • Attributes
  • 52
  • 2.4
  • Color
  • 3
  • 53
  • 2.4.1
  • RGB Color
  • 57
  • 2.4.2
  • Indexed Color
  • 59
  • 2.4.3
  • Setting of Color Attributes
  • 60
  • 1.1.3
  • 2.5
  • Viewing
  • 61
  • 2.5.1
  • Two-Dimensional Viewing
  • 61
  • 2.5.2
  • Orthographic View
  • 62
  • 2.5.3
  • Simulation
  • Matrix Modes
  • 64
  • 2.6
  • Control Functions
  • 64
  • 2.6.1
  • Interaction with the Window System
  • 65
  • 2.6.2
  • Aspect Ratio and Viewports
  • 3
  • 67
  • 2.6.3
  • Main, display, and myinit Functions
  • 68
  • 2.6.4
  • Program Structure
  • 70
  • 2.7
  • Gasket Program
  • 70
  • 1.1.4
  • 2.8
  • Polygons and Recursion
  • 71
  • 2.9
  • Three-Dimensional Gasket
  • 74
  • 2.9.1
  • Use of Three-Dimensional Points
  • 74
  • 2.9.2
  • User Interfaces
  • Use of Polygons in Three Dimensions
  • 76
  • 2.9.3
  • Hidden-Surface Removal
  • 77
  • Chapter 3
  • Input and Interaction
  • 85
  • 3.1
  • Interaction
  • 4
  • 85
  • 3.2
  • Input Devices
  • 87
  • 3.2.1
  • Physical Input Devices
  • 87
  • 3.2.2
  • Logical Devices
  • 90
  • Chapter 1
  • 1.2
  • 3.2.3
  • Measure and Trigger
  • 91
  • 3.2.4
  • Input Modes
  • 92
  • 3.3
  • Clients and Servers
  • 94
  • 3.4
  • A Graphics System
  • Display Lists
  • 95
  • 3.4.1
  • Definition and Execution of Display Lists
  • 97
  • 3.4.2
  • Text and Display Lists
  • 99
  • 3.4.3
  • Fonts in GLUT
  • 5
  • 102
  • 3.5
  • Programming Event-Driven Input
  • 103
  • 3.5.1
  • Using the Pointing Device
  • 103
  • 3.5.2
  • Window Events
  • 106
  • 1.2.1
  • 3.5.3
  • Keyboard Events
  • 108
  • 3.5.4
  • Display and Idle Callbacks
  • 108
  • 3.5.5
  • Window Management
  • 109
  • 3.6
  • Pixels and the Frame Buffer
  • Menus
  • 109
  • 3.7
  • Picking
  • 111
  • 3.8
  • A Simple Paint Program
  • 112
  • 3.9
  • Animating Interactive Programs
  • 6
  • 118
  • 3.9.1
  • Rotating Square
  • 118
  • 3.9.2
  • Double Buffering
  • 120
  • 3.9.3
  • Other Buffering Problems
  • 121
  • 1.2.2
  • 3.10
  • Design of Interactive Programs
  • 122
  • 3.10.1
  • Toolkits, Widgets, and the Frame Buffer
  • 123
  • Chapter 4
  • Geometric Objects and Transformations
  • 129
  • 4.1
  • Output Devices
  • Scalars, Points, and Vectors
  • 130
  • 4.1.1
  • Geometric View
  • 130
  • 4.1.2
  • Mathematical View: Vector and Affine Spaces
  • 131
  • 4.1.3
  • Computer-Science View
  • 7
  • 132
  • 4.1.4
  • Geometric ADTs
  • 133
  • 4.1.5
  • Lines
  • 134
  • 4.1.6
  • Affine Sums
  • 135
  • 1.2.3
  • 4.1.7
  • Convexity
  • 135
  • 4.1.8
  • Dot and Cross Products
  • 136
  • 4.1.9
  • Planes
  • 137
  • 4.2
  • Graphics Systems and Models
  • Input Devices
  • Three-Dimensional Primitives
  • 138
  • 4.3
  • Coordinate Systems and Frames
  • 139
  • 4.3.1
  • Changes of Coordinate Systems
  • 141
  • 4.3.2
  • Example of Change of Representation
  • 8
  • 144
  • 4.3.3
  • Homogeneous Coordinates
  • 145
  • 4.3.4
  • Example of Change in Frames
  • 148
  • 4.3.5
  • Frames and ADTs
  • 149
  • 1.3
  • 4.3.6
  • Frames in OpenGL
  • 151
  • 4.4
  • Modeling a Colored Cube
  • 152
  • 4.4.1
  • Modeling of a Cube
  • 153
  • 4.4.2
  • Images: Physical and Synthetic
  • Inward- and Outward-Pointing Faces
  • 154
  • 4.4.3
  • Data Structures for Object Representation
  • 155
  • 4.4.4
  • Color Cube
  • 156
  • 4.4.5
  • Bilinear Interpolation
  • 9
  • 157
  • 4.4.6
  • Vertex Arrays
  • 158
  • 4.5
  • Affine Transformations
  • 160
  • 4.6
  • Rotation, Translation, and Scaling
  • 163
  • 1.3.1
  • 4.6.1
  • Translation
  • 163
  • 4.6.2
  • Rotation
  • 164
  • 4.6.3
  • Scaling
  • 166
  • 4.7
  • Objects and Viewers
  • Transformations in Homogeneous Coordinates
  • 166
  • 4.7.1
  • Translation
  • 167
  • 4.7.2
  • Scaling
  • 168
  • 4.7.3
  • Rotation
  • 9
  • 168
  • 4.7.4
  • Shear
  • 170
  • 4.8
  • Concatenation of Transformations
  • 171
  • 4.8.1
  • Rotation About a Fixed Point
  • 172
  • 1.3.2
  • 4.8.2
  • General Rotation
  • 173
  • 4.8.3
  • Instance Transformation
  • 174
  • 4.8.4
  • Rotation About an Arbitrary Axis
  • 175
  • 4.9
  • Light and Images
  • OpenGL Transformation Matrices
  • 178
  • 4.9.1
  • Current Transformation Matrix
  • 179
  • 4.9.2
  • Rotation, Translation, and Scaling
  • 180
  • 4.9.3
  • Rotation About a Fixed Point in OpenGL
  • 1
  • 11
  • 180
  • 4.9.4
  • Order of Transformations
  • 181
  • 4.9.5
  • Spinning of the Cube
  • 182
  • 4.9.6
  • Loading, Pushing, and Popping Matrices
  • 183
  • 1.3.3
  • 4.10
  • Interfaces to Three-Dimensional Applications
  • 184
  • 4.10.1
  • Using Areas of the Screen
  • 184
  • 4.10.2
  • A Virtual Trackball
  • 185
  • 4.10.3
  • Ray Tracing
  • Smooth Rotations
  • 187
  • Chapter 5
  • Viewing
  • 193
  • 5.1
  • Classical and Computer Viewing
  • 194
  • 5.1.1
  • Classical Viewing
  • 13
  • 195
  • 5.1.2
  • Orthographic Projections
  • 196
  • 5.1.3
  • Axonometric Projections
  • 197
  • 5.1.4
  • Oblique Projections
  • 198
  • 1.4
  • 5.1.5
  • Perspective Viewing
  • 199
  • 5.2
  • Positioning of the Camera
  • 201
  • 5.2.1
  • Positioning of the Camera Frame
  • 201
  • 5.2.2
  • Human Visual System
  • Two Viewing APIs
  • 206
  • 5.2.3
  • Look-At Function
  • 209
  • 5.2.4
  • Other Viewing APIs
  • 209
  • 5.3
  • Simple Projections
  • 15
  • 210
  • 5.3.1
  • Perspective Projections
  • 211
  • 5.3.2
  • Orthogonal Projections
  • 214
  • 5.4
  • Projections in OpenGL
  • 214
  • 1.5
  • 5.4.1
  • Perspective in OpenGL
  • 215
  • 5.4.2
  • Parallel Viewing in OpenGL
  • 217
  • 5.5
  • Hidden-Surface Removal
  • 218
  • 5.6
  • Pinhole Camera
  • Walking Through a Scene
  • 219
  • 5.7
  • Parallel-Projection Matrices
  • 221
  • 5.7.1
  • Projection Normalization
  • 221
  • 5.7.2
  • Orthogonal-Projection Matrices
  • 17
  • 222
  • 5.7.3
  • Oblique Projections
  • 225
  • 5.8
  • Perspective-Projection Matrices
  • 228
  • 5.8.1
  • Perspective Normalization
  • 228
  • 1.1
  • 1.6
  • 5.8.2
  • OpenGL Perspective Transformations
  • 231
  • 5.9
  • Projections and Shadows
  • 233
  • Chapter 6
  • Shading
  • 239
  • 6.1
  • Synthetic-Camera Model
  • Light and Matter
  • 240
  • 6.2
  • Light Sources
  • 243
  • 6.2.1
  • Color Sources
  • 244
  • 6.2.2
  • Ambient Light
  • 19
  • 244
  • 6.2.3
  • Point Sources
  • 245
  • 6.2.4
  • Spotlights
  • 246
  • 6.2.5
  • Distant Light Sources
  • 246
  • 1.7
  • 6.3
  • Phong Reflection Model
  • 247
  • 6.3.1
  • Ambient Reflection
  • 249
  • 6.3.2
  • Diffuse Reflection
  • 249
  • 6.3.3
  • Programmer's Interface
  • Specular Reflection
  • 250
  • 6.4
  • Computation of Vectors
  • 252
  • 6.4.1
  • Normal Vectors
  • 253
  • 6.4.2
  • Angle of Reflection
  • 21
  • 255
  • 6.4.3
  • Use of the Halfway Vector
  • 256
  • 6.4.4
  • Transmitted Light
  • 257
  • 6.5
  • Polygonal Shading
  • 258
  • 1.7.1
  • 6.5.1
  • Flat Shading
  • 258
  • 6.5.2
  • Interpolative and Gouraud Shading
  • 260
  • 6.5.3
  • Phong Shading
  • 262
  • 6.6
  • Application Programmer's Interfaces
  • Approximation of a Sphere by Recursive Subdivision
  • 263
  • 6.7
  • Light Sources in OpenGL
  • 266
  • 6.8
  • Specification of Materials in OpenGL
  • 268
  • 6.9
  • Shading of the Sphere Model
  • 22
  • 269
  • 6.10
  • Global Rendering
  • 271
  • 6.10.1
  • Ray Tracing
  • 271
  • 6.10.2
  • Radiosity
  • 275
  • 1.7.2
  • Chapter 7
  • Implementation of a Renderer
  • 281
  • 7.1
  • Four Major Tasks
  • 282
  • 7.1.1
  • Modeling
  • 282
  • 7.1.2
  • Applications of Computer Graphics
  • A Sequence of Images
  • Geometric Processing
  • 282
  • 7.1.3
  • Rasterization
  • 283
  • 7.1.4
  • Display
  • 283
  • 7.1.5
  • Basic Implementation Strategies
  • 24
  • 284
  • 7.2
  • Implementation of Transformations
  • 285
  • 7.3
  • Line-Segment Clipping
  • 287
  • 7.3.1
  • Cohen-Sutherland Clipping
  • 288
  • 1.7.3
  • 7.3.2
  • Liang-Barsky Clipping
  • 290
  • 7.4
  • Polygon Clipping
  • 292
  • 7.5
  • Clipping of Other Primitives
  • 295
  • 7.5.1
  • Modeling--Rendering Paradigm
  • Bounding Boxes
  • 295
  • 7.5.2
  • Curves, Surfaces, and Text
  • 296
  • 7.5.3
  • Clipping in the Frame Buffer
  • 297
  • 7.6
  • Clipping in Three Dimensions
  • 25
  • 297
  • 7.7
  • Hidden-Surface Removal
  • 300
  • 7.7.1
  • Object-Space and Image-Space Approaches
  • 301
  • 7.7.2
  • Back-Face Removal
  • 302
  • 1.8
  • 7.7.3
  • Z-Buffer Algorithm
  • 303
  • 7.7.4
  • Depth Sort and the Painter's Algorithm
  • 306
  • 7.7.5
  • Scan-Line Algorithm
  • 308
  • 7.8
  • Graphics Architectures
  • Scan Conversion
  • 309
  • 7.9
  • Bresenham's algorithm
  • 311
  • 7.10
  • Scan Conversion of Polygons
  • 313
  • 7.10.1
  • Inside-Outside Testing
  • 26
  • 314
  • 7.10.2
  • OpenGL and Concave Polygons
  • 315
  • 7.10.3
  • Scan Conversion with the z-Buffer
  • 316
  • 7.10.4
  • Fill and Sort
  • 317
  • 1.8.1
  • 7.10.5
  • Flood Fill
  • 318
  • 7.10.6
  • Scan-Line Algorithms
  • 318
  • 7.10.7
  • Singularities
  • 320
  • 7.11
  • Display Processors
  • Antialiasing
  • 320
  • 7.12
  • Display Considerations
  • 322
  • 7.12.1
  • Color Systems
  • 323
  • 7.12.2
  • Gamma Correction
  • 2
  • 27
  • 326
  • 7.12.3
  • Dithering and Halftoning
  • 327
  • Chapter 8
  • Hierarchical and Object-Oriented Graphics
  • 333
  • 8.1
  • Symbols and Instances
  • 334
  • 1.8.2
  • 8.2
  • Hierarchical Models
  • 335
  • 8.3
  • A Robot Arm
  • 337
  • 8.4
  • Trees and Traversal
  • 340
  • 8.4.1
  • Pipeline Architectures
  • A Stack-Based Traversal
  • 341
  • 8.5
  • Use of Tree Data Structures
  • 344
  • 8.6
  • Animation
  • 347
  • 8.7
  • Graphical Objects
  • 27
  • 349
  • 8.7.1
  • Methods, Attributes, and Messages
  • 350
  • 8.7.2
  • A Cube Object
  • 351
  • 8.7.3
  • Objects and Hierarchy
  • 353
  • 1.8.3
  • 8.7.4
  • Geometric Objects
  • 354
  • 8.8
  • Scene Graphs
  • 355
  • 8.9
  • Other Tree Structures
  • 357
  • 8.9.1
  • Transformations
  • CSG Trees
  • 357
  • 8.9.2
  • BSP Trees
  • 359
  • 8.9.3
  • Quadtrees and Octress
  • 362
  • 8.10
  • Graphics and the Web
  • 29
  • 363
  • 8.10.1
  • Networks and Protocols
  • 363
  • 8.10.2
  • Hypermedia and HTML
  • 364
  • 8.10.3
  • Databases and VRML
  • 365
  • 1.8.4
  • 8.10.4
  • JAVA and Applets
  • 366
  • Chapter 9
  • Discrete Techniques
  • 371
  • 9.1
  • Buffers and Mappings
  • 372
  • 9.2
  • Clipping
  • Texture Mapping
  • 373
  • 9.2.1
  • Two-Dimensional Texture Mapping
  • 374
  • 9.2.2
  • Texture Mapping in OpenGL
  • 379
  • 9.2.3
  • Texture Generation
  • 29
  • 384
  • 9.3
  • Environmental Maps
  • 385
  • 9.4
  • Bump Maps
  • 386
  • 9.5
  • Writes into Buffers
  • 388
  • 1.1.1
  • 1.8.5
  • 9.5.1
  • Writing Modes
  • 389
  • 9.5.2
  • Writes with XOR
  • 390
  • 9.6
  • Bit and Pixel Operations in OpenGL
  • 391
  • Projection
  • 30
  • 1.8.6
  • Rasterization
  • 30
  • 1.8.7
  • Performance Characteristics
  • 30
  • Chapter 2
  • Display of Information
  • Graphics Programming
  • 35
  • 2.1
  • Sierpinski Gasket
  • 36
  • 2.1.1
  • Pen-Plotter Model
  • 37
  • 2.1.2
  • Coordinate Systems
Edition
2nd ed.
Extent
1 online resource (xlii, 612 pages
Form of item
online
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other control number
9780201385977
Other physical details
illustrations (some color))
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1036770209
Label
Interactive computer graphics : a top-down approach with OpenGL, Edward Angel
Link
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 2
  • 42
  • 2.2
  • OpenGL API
  • 43
  • 2.2.1
  • Graphics Functions
  • 44
  • 2.2.2
  • OpenGL Interface
  • 45
  • 1.1.2
  • 2.3
  • Primitives and Attributes
  • 46
  • 2.3.1
  • Polygon Basics
  • 47
  • 2.3.2
  • Polygon Types in OpenGL
  • 49
  • 2.3.3
  • Design
  • Text
  • 50
  • 2.3.4
  • Curved Objects
  • 51
  • 2.3.5
  • Attributes
  • 52
  • 2.4
  • Color
  • 3
  • 53
  • 2.4.1
  • RGB Color
  • 57
  • 2.4.2
  • Indexed Color
  • 59
  • 2.4.3
  • Setting of Color Attributes
  • 60
  • 1.1.3
  • 2.5
  • Viewing
  • 61
  • 2.5.1
  • Two-Dimensional Viewing
  • 61
  • 2.5.2
  • Orthographic View
  • 62
  • 2.5.3
  • Simulation
  • Matrix Modes
  • 64
  • 2.6
  • Control Functions
  • 64
  • 2.6.1
  • Interaction with the Window System
  • 65
  • 2.6.2
  • Aspect Ratio and Viewports
  • 3
  • 67
  • 2.6.3
  • Main, display, and myinit Functions
  • 68
  • 2.6.4
  • Program Structure
  • 70
  • 2.7
  • Gasket Program
  • 70
  • 1.1.4
  • 2.8
  • Polygons and Recursion
  • 71
  • 2.9
  • Three-Dimensional Gasket
  • 74
  • 2.9.1
  • Use of Three-Dimensional Points
  • 74
  • 2.9.2
  • User Interfaces
  • Use of Polygons in Three Dimensions
  • 76
  • 2.9.3
  • Hidden-Surface Removal
  • 77
  • Chapter 3
  • Input and Interaction
  • 85
  • 3.1
  • Interaction
  • 4
  • 85
  • 3.2
  • Input Devices
  • 87
  • 3.2.1
  • Physical Input Devices
  • 87
  • 3.2.2
  • Logical Devices
  • 90
  • Chapter 1
  • 1.2
  • 3.2.3
  • Measure and Trigger
  • 91
  • 3.2.4
  • Input Modes
  • 92
  • 3.3
  • Clients and Servers
  • 94
  • 3.4
  • A Graphics System
  • Display Lists
  • 95
  • 3.4.1
  • Definition and Execution of Display Lists
  • 97
  • 3.4.2
  • Text and Display Lists
  • 99
  • 3.4.3
  • Fonts in GLUT
  • 5
  • 102
  • 3.5
  • Programming Event-Driven Input
  • 103
  • 3.5.1
  • Using the Pointing Device
  • 103
  • 3.5.2
  • Window Events
  • 106
  • 1.2.1
  • 3.5.3
  • Keyboard Events
  • 108
  • 3.5.4
  • Display and Idle Callbacks
  • 108
  • 3.5.5
  • Window Management
  • 109
  • 3.6
  • Pixels and the Frame Buffer
  • Menus
  • 109
  • 3.7
  • Picking
  • 111
  • 3.8
  • A Simple Paint Program
  • 112
  • 3.9
  • Animating Interactive Programs
  • 6
  • 118
  • 3.9.1
  • Rotating Square
  • 118
  • 3.9.2
  • Double Buffering
  • 120
  • 3.9.3
  • Other Buffering Problems
  • 121
  • 1.2.2
  • 3.10
  • Design of Interactive Programs
  • 122
  • 3.10.1
  • Toolkits, Widgets, and the Frame Buffer
  • 123
  • Chapter 4
  • Geometric Objects and Transformations
  • 129
  • 4.1
  • Output Devices
  • Scalars, Points, and Vectors
  • 130
  • 4.1.1
  • Geometric View
  • 130
  • 4.1.2
  • Mathematical View: Vector and Affine Spaces
  • 131
  • 4.1.3
  • Computer-Science View
  • 7
  • 132
  • 4.1.4
  • Geometric ADTs
  • 133
  • 4.1.5
  • Lines
  • 134
  • 4.1.6
  • Affine Sums
  • 135
  • 1.2.3
  • 4.1.7
  • Convexity
  • 135
  • 4.1.8
  • Dot and Cross Products
  • 136
  • 4.1.9
  • Planes
  • 137
  • 4.2
  • Graphics Systems and Models
  • Input Devices
  • Three-Dimensional Primitives
  • 138
  • 4.3
  • Coordinate Systems and Frames
  • 139
  • 4.3.1
  • Changes of Coordinate Systems
  • 141
  • 4.3.2
  • Example of Change of Representation
  • 8
  • 144
  • 4.3.3
  • Homogeneous Coordinates
  • 145
  • 4.3.4
  • Example of Change in Frames
  • 148
  • 4.3.5
  • Frames and ADTs
  • 149
  • 1.3
  • 4.3.6
  • Frames in OpenGL
  • 151
  • 4.4
  • Modeling a Colored Cube
  • 152
  • 4.4.1
  • Modeling of a Cube
  • 153
  • 4.4.2
  • Images: Physical and Synthetic
  • Inward- and Outward-Pointing Faces
  • 154
  • 4.4.3
  • Data Structures for Object Representation
  • 155
  • 4.4.4
  • Color Cube
  • 156
  • 4.4.5
  • Bilinear Interpolation
  • 9
  • 157
  • 4.4.6
  • Vertex Arrays
  • 158
  • 4.5
  • Affine Transformations
  • 160
  • 4.6
  • Rotation, Translation, and Scaling
  • 163
  • 1.3.1
  • 4.6.1
  • Translation
  • 163
  • 4.6.2
  • Rotation
  • 164
  • 4.6.3
  • Scaling
  • 166
  • 4.7
  • Objects and Viewers
  • Transformations in Homogeneous Coordinates
  • 166
  • 4.7.1
  • Translation
  • 167
  • 4.7.2
  • Scaling
  • 168
  • 4.7.3
  • Rotation
  • 9
  • 168
  • 4.7.4
  • Shear
  • 170
  • 4.8
  • Concatenation of Transformations
  • 171
  • 4.8.1
  • Rotation About a Fixed Point
  • 172
  • 1.3.2
  • 4.8.2
  • General Rotation
  • 173
  • 4.8.3
  • Instance Transformation
  • 174
  • 4.8.4
  • Rotation About an Arbitrary Axis
  • 175
  • 4.9
  • Light and Images
  • OpenGL Transformation Matrices
  • 178
  • 4.9.1
  • Current Transformation Matrix
  • 179
  • 4.9.2
  • Rotation, Translation, and Scaling
  • 180
  • 4.9.3
  • Rotation About a Fixed Point in OpenGL
  • 1
  • 11
  • 180
  • 4.9.4
  • Order of Transformations
  • 181
  • 4.9.5
  • Spinning of the Cube
  • 182
  • 4.9.6
  • Loading, Pushing, and Popping Matrices
  • 183
  • 1.3.3
  • 4.10
  • Interfaces to Three-Dimensional Applications
  • 184
  • 4.10.1
  • Using Areas of the Screen
  • 184
  • 4.10.2
  • A Virtual Trackball
  • 185
  • 4.10.3
  • Ray Tracing
  • Smooth Rotations
  • 187
  • Chapter 5
  • Viewing
  • 193
  • 5.1
  • Classical and Computer Viewing
  • 194
  • 5.1.1
  • Classical Viewing
  • 13
  • 195
  • 5.1.2
  • Orthographic Projections
  • 196
  • 5.1.3
  • Axonometric Projections
  • 197
  • 5.1.4
  • Oblique Projections
  • 198
  • 1.4
  • 5.1.5
  • Perspective Viewing
  • 199
  • 5.2
  • Positioning of the Camera
  • 201
  • 5.2.1
  • Positioning of the Camera Frame
  • 201
  • 5.2.2
  • Human Visual System
  • Two Viewing APIs
  • 206
  • 5.2.3
  • Look-At Function
  • 209
  • 5.2.4
  • Other Viewing APIs
  • 209
  • 5.3
  • Simple Projections
  • 15
  • 210
  • 5.3.1
  • Perspective Projections
  • 211
  • 5.3.2
  • Orthogonal Projections
  • 214
  • 5.4
  • Projections in OpenGL
  • 214
  • 1.5
  • 5.4.1
  • Perspective in OpenGL
  • 215
  • 5.4.2
  • Parallel Viewing in OpenGL
  • 217
  • 5.5
  • Hidden-Surface Removal
  • 218
  • 5.6
  • Pinhole Camera
  • Walking Through a Scene
  • 219
  • 5.7
  • Parallel-Projection Matrices
  • 221
  • 5.7.1
  • Projection Normalization
  • 221
  • 5.7.2
  • Orthogonal-Projection Matrices
  • 17
  • 222
  • 5.7.3
  • Oblique Projections
  • 225
  • 5.8
  • Perspective-Projection Matrices
  • 228
  • 5.8.1
  • Perspective Normalization
  • 228
  • 1.1
  • 1.6
  • 5.8.2
  • OpenGL Perspective Transformations
  • 231
  • 5.9
  • Projections and Shadows
  • 233
  • Chapter 6
  • Shading
  • 239
  • 6.1
  • Synthetic-Camera Model
  • Light and Matter
  • 240
  • 6.2
  • Light Sources
  • 243
  • 6.2.1
  • Color Sources
  • 244
  • 6.2.2
  • Ambient Light
  • 19
  • 244
  • 6.2.3
  • Point Sources
  • 245
  • 6.2.4
  • Spotlights
  • 246
  • 6.2.5
  • Distant Light Sources
  • 246
  • 1.7
  • 6.3
  • Phong Reflection Model
  • 247
  • 6.3.1
  • Ambient Reflection
  • 249
  • 6.3.2
  • Diffuse Reflection
  • 249
  • 6.3.3
  • Programmer's Interface
  • Specular Reflection
  • 250
  • 6.4
  • Computation of Vectors
  • 252
  • 6.4.1
  • Normal Vectors
  • 253
  • 6.4.2
  • Angle of Reflection
  • 21
  • 255
  • 6.4.3
  • Use of the Halfway Vector
  • 256
  • 6.4.4
  • Transmitted Light
  • 257
  • 6.5
  • Polygonal Shading
  • 258
  • 1.7.1
  • 6.5.1
  • Flat Shading
  • 258
  • 6.5.2
  • Interpolative and Gouraud Shading
  • 260
  • 6.5.3
  • Phong Shading
  • 262
  • 6.6
  • Application Programmer's Interfaces
  • Approximation of a Sphere by Recursive Subdivision
  • 263
  • 6.7
  • Light Sources in OpenGL
  • 266
  • 6.8
  • Specification of Materials in OpenGL
  • 268
  • 6.9
  • Shading of the Sphere Model
  • 22
  • 269
  • 6.10
  • Global Rendering
  • 271
  • 6.10.1
  • Ray Tracing
  • 271
  • 6.10.2
  • Radiosity
  • 275
  • 1.7.2
  • Chapter 7
  • Implementation of a Renderer
  • 281
  • 7.1
  • Four Major Tasks
  • 282
  • 7.1.1
  • Modeling
  • 282
  • 7.1.2
  • Applications of Computer Graphics
  • A Sequence of Images
  • Geometric Processing
  • 282
  • 7.1.3
  • Rasterization
  • 283
  • 7.1.4
  • Display
  • 283
  • 7.1.5
  • Basic Implementation Strategies
  • 24
  • 284
  • 7.2
  • Implementation of Transformations
  • 285
  • 7.3
  • Line-Segment Clipping
  • 287
  • 7.3.1
  • Cohen-Sutherland Clipping
  • 288
  • 1.7.3
  • 7.3.2
  • Liang-Barsky Clipping
  • 290
  • 7.4
  • Polygon Clipping
  • 292
  • 7.5
  • Clipping of Other Primitives
  • 295
  • 7.5.1
  • Modeling--Rendering Paradigm
  • Bounding Boxes
  • 295
  • 7.5.2
  • Curves, Surfaces, and Text
  • 296
  • 7.5.3
  • Clipping in the Frame Buffer
  • 297
  • 7.6
  • Clipping in Three Dimensions
  • 25
  • 297
  • 7.7
  • Hidden-Surface Removal
  • 300
  • 7.7.1
  • Object-Space and Image-Space Approaches
  • 301
  • 7.7.2
  • Back-Face Removal
  • 302
  • 1.8
  • 7.7.3
  • Z-Buffer Algorithm
  • 303
  • 7.7.4
  • Depth Sort and the Painter's Algorithm
  • 306
  • 7.7.5
  • Scan-Line Algorithm
  • 308
  • 7.8
  • Graphics Architectures
  • Scan Conversion
  • 309
  • 7.9
  • Bresenham's algorithm
  • 311
  • 7.10
  • Scan Conversion of Polygons
  • 313
  • 7.10.1
  • Inside-Outside Testing
  • 26
  • 314
  • 7.10.2
  • OpenGL and Concave Polygons
  • 315
  • 7.10.3
  • Scan Conversion with the z-Buffer
  • 316
  • 7.10.4
  • Fill and Sort
  • 317
  • 1.8.1
  • 7.10.5
  • Flood Fill
  • 318
  • 7.10.6
  • Scan-Line Algorithms
  • 318
  • 7.10.7
  • Singularities
  • 320
  • 7.11
  • Display Processors
  • Antialiasing
  • 320
  • 7.12
  • Display Considerations
  • 322
  • 7.12.1
  • Color Systems
  • 323
  • 7.12.2
  • Gamma Correction
  • 2
  • 27
  • 326
  • 7.12.3
  • Dithering and Halftoning
  • 327
  • Chapter 8
  • Hierarchical and Object-Oriented Graphics
  • 333
  • 8.1
  • Symbols and Instances
  • 334
  • 1.8.2
  • 8.2
  • Hierarchical Models
  • 335
  • 8.3
  • A Robot Arm
  • 337
  • 8.4
  • Trees and Traversal
  • 340
  • 8.4.1
  • Pipeline Architectures
  • A Stack-Based Traversal
  • 341
  • 8.5
  • Use of Tree Data Structures
  • 344
  • 8.6
  • Animation
  • 347
  • 8.7
  • Graphical Objects
  • 27
  • 349
  • 8.7.1
  • Methods, Attributes, and Messages
  • 350
  • 8.7.2
  • A Cube Object
  • 351
  • 8.7.3
  • Objects and Hierarchy
  • 353
  • 1.8.3
  • 8.7.4
  • Geometric Objects
  • 354
  • 8.8
  • Scene Graphs
  • 355
  • 8.9
  • Other Tree Structures
  • 357
  • 8.9.1
  • Transformations
  • CSG Trees
  • 357
  • 8.9.2
  • BSP Trees
  • 359
  • 8.9.3
  • Quadtrees and Octress
  • 362
  • 8.10
  • Graphics and the Web
  • 29
  • 363
  • 8.10.1
  • Networks and Protocols
  • 363
  • 8.10.2
  • Hypermedia and HTML
  • 364
  • 8.10.3
  • Databases and VRML
  • 365
  • 1.8.4
  • 8.10.4
  • JAVA and Applets
  • 366
  • Chapter 9
  • Discrete Techniques
  • 371
  • 9.1
  • Buffers and Mappings
  • 372
  • 9.2
  • Clipping
  • Texture Mapping
  • 373
  • 9.2.1
  • Two-Dimensional Texture Mapping
  • 374
  • 9.2.2
  • Texture Mapping in OpenGL
  • 379
  • 9.2.3
  • Texture Generation
  • 29
  • 384
  • 9.3
  • Environmental Maps
  • 385
  • 9.4
  • Bump Maps
  • 386
  • 9.5
  • Writes into Buffers
  • 388
  • 1.1.1
  • 1.8.5
  • 9.5.1
  • Writing Modes
  • 389
  • 9.5.2
  • Writes with XOR
  • 390
  • 9.6
  • Bit and Pixel Operations in OpenGL
  • 391
  • Projection
  • 30
  • 1.8.6
  • Rasterization
  • 30
  • 1.8.7
  • Performance Characteristics
  • 30
  • Chapter 2
  • Display of Information
  • Graphics Programming
  • 35
  • 2.1
  • Sierpinski Gasket
  • 36
  • 2.1.1
  • Pen-Plotter Model
  • 37
  • 2.1.2
  • Coordinate Systems
Edition
2nd ed.
Extent
1 online resource (xlii, 612 pages
Form of item
online
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other control number
9780201385977
Other physical details
illustrations (some color))
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1036770209

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