The Resource Incrementalism and public policy, Michael T. Hayes

Incrementalism and public policy, Michael T. Hayes

Label
Incrementalism and public policy
Title
Incrementalism and public policy
Statement of responsibility
Michael T. Hayes
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
COF
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1949-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Hayes, Michael T.
Dewey number
353.07/2
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
JK271
LC item number
.H498 2006
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Political planning
  • United States
  • Political planning
  • Politics and government
  • United States
Label
Incrementalism and public policy, Michael T. Hayes
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 201-213) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 6
  • Implementation of the Act under President Carter
  • 104
  • Decentralization of Enforcement under the Reagan Administration
  • 111
  • Chapter 8
  • The Policy Process: Some Generalizations
  • 118
  • Problem Indentification and Agenda Setting
  • 118
  • Policy Adoption
  • The Sources of Incrementalism
  • 120
  • Policy Implementation
  • 124
  • How to Explain Nonincremental Change
  • 126
  • Part II
  • Understanding Policy Change
  • 129
  • Chapter 9
  • Rationality and Nonincremental Policy
  • 7
  • 131
  • Two Cases of Nonincremental Change
  • 131
  • A Reformulation of Lindblom's Typology
  • 132
  • Policy-Making in the Four Quadrants
  • 136
  • Nonincremental Change and the Four Quadrants
  • 140
  • Chapter 10
  • The Sources of Policy Change
  • When Is Policy Change Nonincremental?
  • 146
  • Defining Nonincremental Change
  • 146
  • A Typology of Policy Change
  • 147
  • Familiar Policies, Policy Communities, and Nonincremental Change
  • 153
  • A Typology of Policy Contraction
  • 159
  • 9
  • Chapter 11
  • Welfare Reform: Obstacles to Nonincremental Change
  • 169
  • AFDC and the Welfare Crisis
  • 169
  • The Case for a Negative Income Tax
  • 172
  • The Breakdown of Rationality
  • 174
  • Incrementalism and Welfare Reform in the Nixon Administration
  • Part I
  • 177
  • Comprehensive Welfare Reform under President Carter
  • 185
  • The Legacy of Failed Reform
  • 190
  • Chapter 12
  • Policy Change: Constraints and Possibilities
  • 195
  • The Sources of Incrementalism
  • 11
  • Chapter 2
  • Incrementalism and the Limits of Rationality
  • Chapter 1
  • 13
  • The Rational-Comprehensive Ideal
  • 14
  • The Limits of Rationality
  • 15
  • Incrementalism as an Alternative to Rationality
  • 16
  • Policy Change under the Incremental Model
  • 20
  • Is Incrementalism Desirable?
  • Models of Policy Change
  • 22
  • Chapter 3
  • Multiple Veto Points and the Need for Concurrent Majorities
  • 27
  • The Problem of Factions
  • 27
  • Policy-Making in a Compound Republic
  • 31
  • Policy Change under the Classical Model
  • 39
  • 1
  • Chapter 4
  • The Unequal Group Struggle
  • 44
  • The Group Basis of Politics
  • 45
  • The Systematic Bias to the Group Universe
  • 46
  • The Balance of Forces
  • 48
  • The Group Struggle and the Evolution of Policy
  • The Policy Process
  • 50
  • Policy Change and the Group Struggle Model
  • 55
  • Chapter 5
  • The Privileged Position of Business
  • 63
  • The Market as Prison
  • 63
  • The Sources of Business Power
  • 64
  • 2
  • The Importance of the Agenda
  • 67
  • Corporate Power and the Agenda
  • 69
  • Business Influence on Observed Decisions
  • 71
  • Imperfect Competition
  • 73
  • Corporate Power and Policy Change
  • 75
  • Incrementalism and Policy Change
  • Chapter 6
  • Is There an Alternative to Incrementalism?
  • 80
  • Responsible Parties and the Evolution of Policy
  • 81
  • Majority Rule and Responsible Parties
  • 82
  • Voters, Parties, and Issues
  • 83
  • The Decline of Party Identification
  • 4
  • 85
  • The Decline of the Parties as Electoral Institutions
  • 86
  • The Decline of the Parties as Governing Institutions
  • 87
  • The Parties as "Potential Groups"
  • 88
  • Parties and the Responsibility for Performance in Office
  • 89
  • An Unsentimental Defense of the American Political System
  • Understanding and Evaluating the Policy Process through Models
  • 91
  • Chapter 7
  • Federalism, Corporate Power, and Surface Mining Regulation
  • 97
  • Trade-Offs among Conflicting Objectives
  • 97
  • The Surface Mining Issue Reaches the Federal Agenda
  • 99
  • The Struggle for a Strip Mining Law, 1971-1977
  • 101
Extent
1 online resource (x, 222 pages
Form of item
online
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations)
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1035664612
Label
Incrementalism and public policy, Michael T. Hayes
Link
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 201-213) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 6
  • Implementation of the Act under President Carter
  • 104
  • Decentralization of Enforcement under the Reagan Administration
  • 111
  • Chapter 8
  • The Policy Process: Some Generalizations
  • 118
  • Problem Indentification and Agenda Setting
  • 118
  • Policy Adoption
  • The Sources of Incrementalism
  • 120
  • Policy Implementation
  • 124
  • How to Explain Nonincremental Change
  • 126
  • Part II
  • Understanding Policy Change
  • 129
  • Chapter 9
  • Rationality and Nonincremental Policy
  • 7
  • 131
  • Two Cases of Nonincremental Change
  • 131
  • A Reformulation of Lindblom's Typology
  • 132
  • Policy-Making in the Four Quadrants
  • 136
  • Nonincremental Change and the Four Quadrants
  • 140
  • Chapter 10
  • The Sources of Policy Change
  • When Is Policy Change Nonincremental?
  • 146
  • Defining Nonincremental Change
  • 146
  • A Typology of Policy Change
  • 147
  • Familiar Policies, Policy Communities, and Nonincremental Change
  • 153
  • A Typology of Policy Contraction
  • 159
  • 9
  • Chapter 11
  • Welfare Reform: Obstacles to Nonincremental Change
  • 169
  • AFDC and the Welfare Crisis
  • 169
  • The Case for a Negative Income Tax
  • 172
  • The Breakdown of Rationality
  • 174
  • Incrementalism and Welfare Reform in the Nixon Administration
  • Part I
  • 177
  • Comprehensive Welfare Reform under President Carter
  • 185
  • The Legacy of Failed Reform
  • 190
  • Chapter 12
  • Policy Change: Constraints and Possibilities
  • 195
  • The Sources of Incrementalism
  • 11
  • Chapter 2
  • Incrementalism and the Limits of Rationality
  • Chapter 1
  • 13
  • The Rational-Comprehensive Ideal
  • 14
  • The Limits of Rationality
  • 15
  • Incrementalism as an Alternative to Rationality
  • 16
  • Policy Change under the Incremental Model
  • 20
  • Is Incrementalism Desirable?
  • Models of Policy Change
  • 22
  • Chapter 3
  • Multiple Veto Points and the Need for Concurrent Majorities
  • 27
  • The Problem of Factions
  • 27
  • Policy-Making in a Compound Republic
  • 31
  • Policy Change under the Classical Model
  • 39
  • 1
  • Chapter 4
  • The Unequal Group Struggle
  • 44
  • The Group Basis of Politics
  • 45
  • The Systematic Bias to the Group Universe
  • 46
  • The Balance of Forces
  • 48
  • The Group Struggle and the Evolution of Policy
  • The Policy Process
  • 50
  • Policy Change and the Group Struggle Model
  • 55
  • Chapter 5
  • The Privileged Position of Business
  • 63
  • The Market as Prison
  • 63
  • The Sources of Business Power
  • 64
  • 2
  • The Importance of the Agenda
  • 67
  • Corporate Power and the Agenda
  • 69
  • Business Influence on Observed Decisions
  • 71
  • Imperfect Competition
  • 73
  • Corporate Power and Policy Change
  • 75
  • Incrementalism and Policy Change
  • Chapter 6
  • Is There an Alternative to Incrementalism?
  • 80
  • Responsible Parties and the Evolution of Policy
  • 81
  • Majority Rule and Responsible Parties
  • 82
  • Voters, Parties, and Issues
  • 83
  • The Decline of Party Identification
  • 4
  • 85
  • The Decline of the Parties as Electoral Institutions
  • 86
  • The Decline of the Parties as Governing Institutions
  • 87
  • The Parties as "Potential Groups"
  • 88
  • Parties and the Responsibility for Performance in Office
  • 89
  • An Unsentimental Defense of the American Political System
  • Understanding and Evaluating the Policy Process through Models
  • 91
  • Chapter 7
  • Federalism, Corporate Power, and Surface Mining Regulation
  • 97
  • Trade-Offs among Conflicting Objectives
  • 97
  • The Surface Mining Issue Reaches the Federal Agenda
  • 99
  • The Struggle for a Strip Mining Law, 1971-1977
  • 101
Extent
1 online resource (x, 222 pages
Form of item
online
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations)
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1035664612

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