The Resource [Incomplete letter to] My dearest friend

[Incomplete letter to] My dearest friend

Label
[Incomplete letter to] My dearest friend
Title
[Incomplete letter to] My dearest friend
Creator
Contributor
Recipient
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1787-1860
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Follen, Eliza Lee Cabot
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1806-1885
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Chapman, Maria Weston
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Follen, Eliza Lee Cabot
  • Chapman, Maria Weston
  • Stowe, Harriet Beecher
  • American Anti-Slavery Society
  • African Americans
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Incomplete letter to] My dearest friend
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph
  • The end of this letter is missing. Eliza Lee Cabot Follen tells what is on her mind in regard to a school for colored pupils planned by Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe. She agrees with Maria Chapman, but considers that "this is Mrs. Stowe's affair" and that she will probably have her own way in any case. Follen is in favor of the school plan and believes that the education of free colored people is a step toward their freedom. She believes Mrs. Maria Chapman is not "quite moonstruck enough" to believe that she can induce Mrs. Stowe to deliver the money raised by her friends "for her to use as she thinks best" into the hands of the American Anti-Slavery Society. She suggests advising Mrs. Stowe to place the money in the hands of the trustees to be used for the education of colored men or women in any school or college in America or Europe to which they can obtain admittance
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Incomplete letter to] My dearest friend
Link
Publication
Note
  • Holograph
  • The end of this letter is missing. Eliza Lee Cabot Follen tells what is on her mind in regard to a school for colored pupils planned by Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe. She agrees with Maria Chapman, but considers that "this is Mrs. Stowe's affair" and that she will probably have her own way in any case. Follen is in favor of the school plan and believes that the education of free colored people is a step toward their freedom. She believes Mrs. Maria Chapman is not "quite moonstruck enough" to believe that she can induce Mrs. Stowe to deliver the money raised by her friends "for her to use as she thinks best" into the hands of the American Anti-Slavery Society. She suggests advising Mrs. Stowe to place the money in the hands of the trustees to be used for the education of colored men or women in any school or college in America or Europe to which they can obtain admittance
Extent
1 online resource (1 leaf (4 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

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