The Resource Getting the real story : censorship and propaganda in South Africa, edited by Gerald B. Sperling and James E. McKenzie

Getting the real story : censorship and propaganda in South Africa, edited by Gerald B. Sperling and James E. McKenzie

Label
Getting the real story : censorship and propaganda in South Africa
Title
Getting the real story
Title remainder
censorship and propaganda in South Africa
Statement of responsibility
edited by Gerald B. Sperling and James E. McKenzie
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
Dewey number
323.44/5/0968
Illustrations
portraits
Index
no index present
LC call number
PN4748.S58
LC item number
G48 1990
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Sperling, Gerald B
  • McKenzie, James E
  • University of Regina
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Freedom of the press
  • Mass media
  • Propaganda, South African
  • Journalism
  • Mass media
  • Mass media
  • Mass media
  • Freedom of the press
  • Journalism
  • Mass media
  • Mass media
  • Propaganda, South African
  • South Africa
  • Massenmedien
  • Zensur
  • Politik
  • Südafrika (Staat)
Label
Getting the real story : censorship and propaganda in South Africa, edited by Gerald B. Sperling and James E. McKenzie
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Based on papers presented in March 1989 at a conference organized by the School of Journalism and Communications, University of Regina
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • (7 p.).
  • It doesn't have to be a bloodbath : South Africa is a potentially normal country
  • Gwynne Dyer
  • (5 p.).
  • South Africa's press stands on the edge of a new frontier, says a former Rand Daily Mail staff member
  • Phillip Van Niekerk
  • (3 p.).
  • Foreign support is vital to the survival of the alternative press, says the co-editor of one of South Africa's leading opposition papers
  • Anton Harber
  • (8 p.).
  • March : a month dripping in the blood of South Africa
  • "Media guerillas" counter the official violence of the state by shooting back with their only weapons--words
  • Ameen Akhalwaya
  • (8 p.)
  • Joe Thloloe
  • (6 p.).
  • Revolution has been stalled, but this may provide an opportunity for peaceful change
  • Heribert Adam
  • (6 p.).
  • Government uses the carrot and stick approach to hold power over blacks
  • Henry Isaacs
  • (7 p.).
  • Government tries to force bad news about South Africa off the front pages and the TV news
  • Anthony Giffard
  • (6 p.).
  • Government effectively puts the lid on South Africa discontent
  • Patrick Nagle
  • (4 p.).
  • Government sees foreign correspondents as 'villains and thieves'
  • Nigel Wrench
  • (8 p.).
  • Government cracks down on South Africa's first anti-apatheid newspaper published in Afrikaans
  • Zimbabwe a special target of South African disinformation campaign
  • Govin Reddy
  • (5 p.).
  • TV is the major field of battle in the censorship war
  • Brian McKenna
  • (3 p.)
  • Max Du Preez
  • (4 p.).
  • Government and "white liberals" combine to suppress black journalists, says a senior editor of The Sowetan
  • Thami Mazwai
  • (6 p.).
  • To run a decent newspaper, you've got to break the law, says a senior editor
  • Harvey Tyson
  • (9 p.).
  • South Africa's uses censorship and propaganda as weapons of political warfare
  • William Hachten
  • (5 p.).
  • Muldergate scandal exposed government propaganda campaign
  • Anthony Giffard
  • (10 p.).
  • ANC image distorted by government propaganda
  • Francis Meli
  • (5 p.).
  • CBC-TV wants to return to South Africa but the South African government keeps saying no
  • Canadians shouldn't be smug about South Africa
  • Angus Gunn
  • (6 p.)
  • George Hoff
  • (3 p.).
  • News media should fight back rather than knuckle under to censorship
  • Sharon Sopher
  • (6 p.).
  • South Africa's public image largely determined by what people see on TV
  • Peter Davis
Extent
1 online resource (vi, 168 pages
Form of item
online
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
portraits)
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1033642924
Label
Getting the real story : censorship and propaganda in South Africa, edited by Gerald B. Sperling and James E. McKenzie
Link
Publication
Note
Based on papers presented in March 1989 at a conference organized by the School of Journalism and Communications, University of Regina
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • (7 p.).
  • It doesn't have to be a bloodbath : South Africa is a potentially normal country
  • Gwynne Dyer
  • (5 p.).
  • South Africa's press stands on the edge of a new frontier, says a former Rand Daily Mail staff member
  • Phillip Van Niekerk
  • (3 p.).
  • Foreign support is vital to the survival of the alternative press, says the co-editor of one of South Africa's leading opposition papers
  • Anton Harber
  • (8 p.).
  • March : a month dripping in the blood of South Africa
  • "Media guerillas" counter the official violence of the state by shooting back with their only weapons--words
  • Ameen Akhalwaya
  • (8 p.)
  • Joe Thloloe
  • (6 p.).
  • Revolution has been stalled, but this may provide an opportunity for peaceful change
  • Heribert Adam
  • (6 p.).
  • Government uses the carrot and stick approach to hold power over blacks
  • Henry Isaacs
  • (7 p.).
  • Government tries to force bad news about South Africa off the front pages and the TV news
  • Anthony Giffard
  • (6 p.).
  • Government effectively puts the lid on South Africa discontent
  • Patrick Nagle
  • (4 p.).
  • Government sees foreign correspondents as 'villains and thieves'
  • Nigel Wrench
  • (8 p.).
  • Government cracks down on South Africa's first anti-apatheid newspaper published in Afrikaans
  • Zimbabwe a special target of South African disinformation campaign
  • Govin Reddy
  • (5 p.).
  • TV is the major field of battle in the censorship war
  • Brian McKenna
  • (3 p.)
  • Max Du Preez
  • (4 p.).
  • Government and "white liberals" combine to suppress black journalists, says a senior editor of The Sowetan
  • Thami Mazwai
  • (6 p.).
  • To run a decent newspaper, you've got to break the law, says a senior editor
  • Harvey Tyson
  • (9 p.).
  • South Africa's uses censorship and propaganda as weapons of political warfare
  • William Hachten
  • (5 p.).
  • Muldergate scandal exposed government propaganda campaign
  • Anthony Giffard
  • (10 p.).
  • ANC image distorted by government propaganda
  • Francis Meli
  • (5 p.).
  • CBC-TV wants to return to South Africa but the South African government keeps saying no
  • Canadians shouldn't be smug about South Africa
  • Angus Gunn
  • (6 p.)
  • George Hoff
  • (3 p.).
  • News media should fight back rather than knuckle under to censorship
  • Sharon Sopher
  • (6 p.).
  • South Africa's public image largely determined by what people see on TV
  • Peter Davis
Extent
1 online resource (vi, 168 pages
Form of item
online
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
portraits)
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1033642924

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