The Resource [Diary entries by Caroline Weston]

[Diary entries by Caroline Weston]

Label
[Diary entries by Caroline Weston]
Title
[Diary entries by Caroline Weston]
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
BRL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1808-1882
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Weston, Caroline
Index
no index present
Literary form
letters
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Weston, Caroline
  • Chapman, Maria Weston
  • Thompson, George
  • Antislavery movements
  • Women abolitionists
Label
[Diary entries by Caroline Weston]
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Holograph
  • Caroline Weston's diary begins with an entry on Sunday, Sept. 13, 1835. She criticizes the preachers she heard, including [Ezra Stiles?] Gannett. Wednesday, [Sept.] 16: She comments on a dinner at West Street with Mr. and Mrs. George Thompson as "a horrid concern," although Thompson himself was very entertaining. Thursday, [Sept.] 17: She records a social evening at her house and names the guests. Saturday, [Sept.] 19: She describes an hour spent with George Thompson, "I am liking him better and better." And tells of Anne Warren Weston's departure with Thompson for Weymouth as their being "in a state of great exaltation." She reflects that "they cannot get up a mob in Braintree or Weymouth." She praises a letter from Miss Grimke to William Lloyd Garrison. Sunday, [Sept.] 20: She describes her ride to Weymouth, where Anne W. Weston reported the success of [George Thompson's] preaching. Caroline Weston describes, summariezes, and comments on an evening lecture by Thompson in a Weymouth church. Thursday, Sept. 24: She comments on a convention in the Odeon, where "the wine question was discussed furiously." Mrs. Maria W. Chapman is engaged in forming an anti-slavery society in Weymouth. Friday, [Sept.] 25: Mary Parker told that our friend [George Thompson] had been mobbed at Abington and "just grazed by a stone." Caroline Weston was "in great trepidation" at home during the meeting of the New England Anti-Slavery Society, but found that the meeting, with George Thompson as speaker, was undisturbed. Caroline attended the "monthly concert of prayer for the slaves" at Deacon [John?] Gulliver's. Caroline reflects that the "covenant with hell is broken." Sunday, [Oct. 4]: She criticizes the preaching at [John] Pierpont's church and at the Free Church. Monday, [Oct.] 5th: Caroline attended "a most excellent meeting" at which George Thompson spoke splendidly, and Jarvis Gregg" gave his testimony as to the throat-out charge." Thursday, [Oct.] 8: The new quarter at Caroline's school begins, with two new scholars and two more expected. The school "will do pretty well--but it cannot be denied that it might be better--never mind--there is nothing like waiting patiently..." The Rev. Mr. Burton and George Thompson came in the evening. Caroline compares the two, praising Thompson's "style of argument." Mrs. Maria W. Chapman had an abolition play at her own house. Sunday, [Oct.] 11: She comments caustically on the preachers she heard, including Ralph Randolph Gurley. She tells where the notice of the meeting of the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society was read and where not. Mr. Samuel J. May called and gave Caroline much information. Caroline heard of the sudden death of Mr. Moorfield and reflects on the passing of many acquaintances. Jan. 22, 1837: Anti-Slavery notices were sent to all the churches in Boston. John Pierpont did not read the notice
  • The final page of Caroline's diary is missing. It refers to George Thompson's lecture/engagement in Abington
  • Also includes an envelope with a short note written on the front; written by unknown person
Extent
1 online resource (12 leaves (24 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote
Label
[Diary entries by Caroline Weston]
Link
Publication
Note
  • Holograph
  • Caroline Weston's diary begins with an entry on Sunday, Sept. 13, 1835. She criticizes the preachers she heard, including [Ezra Stiles?] Gannett. Wednesday, [Sept.] 16: She comments on a dinner at West Street with Mr. and Mrs. George Thompson as "a horrid concern," although Thompson himself was very entertaining. Thursday, [Sept.] 17: She records a social evening at her house and names the guests. Saturday, [Sept.] 19: She describes an hour spent with George Thompson, "I am liking him better and better." And tells of Anne Warren Weston's departure with Thompson for Weymouth as their being "in a state of great exaltation." She reflects that "they cannot get up a mob in Braintree or Weymouth." She praises a letter from Miss Grimke to William Lloyd Garrison. Sunday, [Sept.] 20: She describes her ride to Weymouth, where Anne W. Weston reported the success of [George Thompson's] preaching. Caroline Weston describes, summariezes, and comments on an evening lecture by Thompson in a Weymouth church. Thursday, Sept. 24: She comments on a convention in the Odeon, where "the wine question was discussed furiously." Mrs. Maria W. Chapman is engaged in forming an anti-slavery society in Weymouth. Friday, [Sept.] 25: Mary Parker told that our friend [George Thompson] had been mobbed at Abington and "just grazed by a stone." Caroline Weston was "in great trepidation" at home during the meeting of the New England Anti-Slavery Society, but found that the meeting, with George Thompson as speaker, was undisturbed. Caroline attended the "monthly concert of prayer for the slaves" at Deacon [John?] Gulliver's. Caroline reflects that the "covenant with hell is broken." Sunday, [Oct. 4]: She criticizes the preaching at [John] Pierpont's church and at the Free Church. Monday, [Oct.] 5th: Caroline attended "a most excellent meeting" at which George Thompson spoke splendidly, and Jarvis Gregg" gave his testimony as to the throat-out charge." Thursday, [Oct.] 8: The new quarter at Caroline's school begins, with two new scholars and two more expected. The school "will do pretty well--but it cannot be denied that it might be better--never mind--there is nothing like waiting patiently..." The Rev. Mr. Burton and George Thompson came in the evening. Caroline compares the two, praising Thompson's "style of argument." Mrs. Maria W. Chapman had an abolition play at her own house. Sunday, [Oct.] 11: She comments caustically on the preachers she heard, including Ralph Randolph Gurley. She tells where the notice of the meeting of the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society was read and where not. Mr. Samuel J. May called and gave Caroline much information. Caroline heard of the sudden death of Mr. Moorfield and reflects on the passing of many acquaintances. Jan. 22, 1837: Anti-Slavery notices were sent to all the churches in Boston. John Pierpont did not read the notice
  • The final page of Caroline's diary is missing. It refers to George Thompson's lecture/engagement in Abington
  • Also includes an envelope with a short note written on the front; written by unknown person
Extent
1 online resource (12 leaves (24 pages))
Form of item
online
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

  • Internet ArchiveBorrow it
    300 Funston Ave, San Francisco, CA, 94118, US
    37.7823215 -122.4716373

Library Links

Processing Feedback ...